Video Library

Since 2002 Perimeter Institute has been recording seminars, conference talks, public outreach events such as talks from top scientists using video cameras installed in our lecture theatres.  Perimeter now has 7 formal presentation spaces for its many scientific conferences, seminars, workshops and educational outreach activities, all with advanced audio-visual technical capabilities. 

Recordings of events in these areas are all available and On-Demand from this Video Library and on Perimeter Institute Recorded Seminar Archive (PIRSA)PIRSA is a permanent, free, searchable, and citable archive of recorded seminars from relevant bodies in physics. This resource has been partially modelled after Cornell University's arXiv.org. 

Accessibly by anyone with internet, Perimeter aims to share the power and wonder of science with this free library.

 

  

 

Thursday Nov 28, 2019
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With the detection of GW170817 we have observed the first multi messenger signal from two merging neutron stars. This signal carried a multitude of information about the underlying equation of state (EOS) of nuclear matter, which so far is not known for densities above nuclear saturation. In particular it is not known if exotic states or even a phase transition to quark matter can occur at densities so extreme that they can't be probed by any current experiment.

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Thursday Nov 28, 2019
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There is a standard generalization of stabilizer codes to work with qudits which have prime dimension, and a slightly less standard generalization for qudits whose dimension is a prime power. However, for prime power dimensions, the usual generalization effectively treats the qudit as multiple prime-dimensional qudits instead of one larger object. There is a finite field GF(q) with size equal to any prime power, and it makes sense to label the qudit basis states with elements of the finite field, but the usual stabilizer codes do not make use of the structure of the finite field.

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Thursday Nov 28, 2019
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A self-correcting quantum memory can store and protect quantum information for a time that increases without bound in the system size, without the need for active error correction. Unfortunately, the landscape of Hamiltonians based on stabilizer (subspace) codes is heavily constrained by numerous no-go results and it is not known if they can exist in three dimensions or less. In this talk, we will discuss the role of symmetry in self-correcting memories.

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Wednesday Nov 27, 2019
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We introduce the hemicubic codes, a family of quantum codes obtained by associating qubits with the

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Wednesday Nov 27, 2019
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We provide the first example of a symmetry protected quantum phase that has universal computational power. Throughout this phase, which lives in spatial dimension two, the ground state is a universal resource for measurement based quantum computation. Joint work with Cihan Okay, Dong-Sheng Wang, David T. Stephen, Hendrik Poulsen Nautrup; J-ref: Phys. Rev. Lett. 122, 090501

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Wednesday Nov 27, 2019
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It is known that several sub-universal quantum computing models cannot be classically simulated unless the polynomial-time
hierarchy collapses. However, these results exclude only polynomial-time classical simulations. In this talk, based on fine-grained
complexity conjectures, I show more ``fine-grained" quantum supremacy results that prohibit certain exponential-time classical simulations.
I also show the stabilizer rank conjecture under fine-grained complexity conjectures.

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Wednesday Nov 27, 2019
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Consider the task of estimating the expectation value of an n-qubit tensor product observable in the output state of a shallow quantum circuit. This task is a cornerstone of variational quantum algorithms for optimization, machine learning, and the simulation of quantum many-body systems. In this talk I will describe three special cases of this problem which are "easy" for classical computers. This is joint work with Sergey Bravyi and Ramis Movassagh.

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