Particle Physics

This series consists of talks in the areas of Particle Physics, High Energy Physics & Quantum Field Theory.

Seminar Series Events/Videos

Currently there are no upcoming talks in this series.

 

Wednesday May 27, 2015
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Identifying the nature of dark  matter is one of the most challenging problems in physics. There is a general consensus that dark matter is a weakly interacting particle and predominantly cold, yet the Cold Dark Matter (CDM) hypothesis remains to be verified.  I will show that next cosmological surveys could play a leading role in understanding the dark matter microphysics.

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Tuesday May 26, 2015
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In this talk I’ll discuss some of the recent developments in precision physics which will be useful for extracting the best physics results we can from LHC run II. I’ll mostly focus on a specific example regarding anomalous interactions of the Higgs boson.

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Tuesday May 26, 2015
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Massive neutral fermions can be realized in Nature as Majorana particles. Are neutrinos Majorana particles? Our most accepted theoretical prejudice can be verified by searching for neutrinoless double-beta decay. I will overview the current knowledge of the neutrino mass spectrum and discuss theoretical scenarios where cosmological data can contribute to resolve this challenging question. Some cosmological observables sensitive to neutrino masses are outlined.

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Tuesday May 19, 2015
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There have been recent claims that the weak gravity conjecture (WGC) rules out multi-field natural inflation. I review these claims and then show how 2-field natural inflation can be consistent with even the most stringent form of WGC. I also discuss my recent attempt at numerically proving the WGC via the conformal bootstrap.

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Tuesday May 12, 2015
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Super-massive black holes that grow at the center of dark matter halos distort the dark matter within their zone of influence into a steep density spike. This spike can give rise to strong enhancements of standard indirect detection signals, and can lead to qualitatively new windows onto the physics of the early universe. I will talk about potential dark matter signals from the Milky Way's central black hole, some astrophysical caveats, and the possible use of black holes as dark matter accelerators.

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Tuesday May 12, 2015
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Recent landmark measurement of the muonic hydrogen Lamb shift generated more questions than answers, as it stands in a sharp disagreement with what was predicted based on known properties of muons and protons. It adds on top of the existing anomalies in the muon sector (discrepancy in g-2 and in radiative muon capture). I will critically review some suggestions for the new physics explanations of these anomalies, and describe their implications.

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Friday May 08, 2015
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Tuesday May 05, 2015
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Astrophysical observations suggest that the majority of matter in the Universe is made up of novel Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs). Such WIMPs are often predicted by extensions to the Standard Model. Efforts have been underway for more than two decades to detect WIMPs directly in detectors on earth. The challenge is great because of the small energies involved and the low interaction rates. The field has been driven by progress in detectors able to identify radioactive backgrounds.

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Tuesday May 05, 2015
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Can we learn about New Physics with astronomical and astro-particle data? Understanding how this is possible is key to unraveling one of the most pressing mysteries at the interface of cosmology and particle physics: the fundamental, particle nature of the dark matter.

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Tuesday Apr 28, 2015
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Astrophysical observations of the structure of galaxies and clusters are no longer simply proving the existence of DM, but have sharpened into a discovery tool probing the particle physics of dark matter. I discuss small scale structure anomalies for cold dark matter and their possible implications for dark matter physics, such as the existence of forces in the dark sector. New results on cluster scales provide a new important handle for constraining dark matter's particle interactions.

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