Particle Physics

This series consists of talks in the areas of Particle Physics, High Energy Physics & Quantum Field Theory.

Seminar Series Events/Videos

Currently there are no upcoming talks in this series.

 

Friday Feb 20, 2015

The Higgs boson was discovered at the LHC more than two years ago.
So far, the LHC data is consistent with the Standard Model (SM)
predictions. Given its increased rate in the next run of the LHC
with a center-of-mass energy of 14 TeV, double Higgs production will
become an important channel in the search for deviations from the SM
due to new heavy particles. The study of double Higgs production is
also important for understanding the structure of the scalar potential.
In this talk, I will review the production mechanism of double Higgs

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Tuesday Feb 17, 2015
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The Higgs couplings to fermions are known parameters within the Standard Model. Deviations from these
expectations would be clear signals of new physics and are thus important target measurements for the LHC program. 
In this talk I shall discuss ways to extra information about the coupling of the Higgs boson to the charm quark with
emphasis on methods applicable with the available LHC data set. A novel method based on the current ATLAS and CMS
Hbb measurement will be presented and compared to our knowledge so far.  Future projections and the even more

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Tuesday Jan 20, 2015
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If dark matter is asymmetric, fermionic, and self-interacting, it may form black holes in pulsars at the galactic center. In this case, a measurable maximum attainable pulsar age would track the density of the dark matter halo, with the oldest pulsars being allowed in the least dense parts of the halo. This could explain a recent observation, that there are not as many pulsars in the galactic center as expected.

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Tuesday Dec 09, 2014
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The cosmological model based on cold dark matter (CDM) and dark energy has been hugely successful in describing the observed evolution and large scale structure of our Universe.  However, at small scales (in the smallest galaxies and at the centers of larger galaxies), a number of observations seem to conflict with the predictions CDM cosmology, leading to recent interest in Warm Dark Matter (WDM) and Self-Interacting Dark Matter (SIDM) models. These small scales, though, are also regions dominated by the influence of baryons.

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Wednesday Dec 03, 2014
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In the search for dark matter, neutrino experiments can play a key role by doubling as dark matter production and detection experiments. I will describe how the proposed DAEdALUS decay-at-rest neutrino experiment can be used to search for MeV-scale dark matter, with particular emphasis on dark matter produced through a dark photon in rare neutral pion decays. The fact that the dark photon need not be on-shell opens up a wide range of new possibilities for the experimental program of searching for dark matter at neutrino experiments.

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Tuesday Dec 02, 2014
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Recent comparison between observation and expectation could point to problems with the standard cold, non-interacting dark matter picture, one of which being how small the smallest gravitationally bound dark matter halos are. I will review the cold dark matter picture and the experimental tests. One solution to the problems comes from coupling the dark matter to neutrinos. I will describe the model building requirements of such a coupling and determine how to test this scenario.

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Friday Nov 28, 2014
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Moduli fields with Planck suppressed couplings to light species are ubiquitous in string theory and supersymmetry. These scalar fields are expected to dominate the energy budget in the early universe. Their out-of-equilibrium decays can produce dark matter and baryons. Dark matter generated in this non-thermal manner typically has large annihilation rates that are strongly constrained by indirect detection. The resulting bounds on superpartner masses offer dim prospects for collider discovery of supersymmetry.

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Tuesday Nov 25, 2014
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A new experiment called PTOLEMY (Princeton Tritium Observatory for Light, Early-Universe, Massive-Neutrino Yield) is under development at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory with the goal of challenging one of the most fundamental predictions of the Big Bang – the present-day existence of relic neutrinos produced less than one second after the Big Bang.  Using a gigantic graphene surface to hold 100 grams of a single-atomic layer of tritium, low noise antennas that sense the radio waves of individual electrons undergoing cyclotron motion, and a massive array of cryogenic sensors that s

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Friday Nov 14, 2014
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Thursday Nov 06, 2014
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