Cosmology & Gravitation

This series consists of talks in the areas of Cosmology, Gravitation and Particle Physics.

Seminar Series Events/Videos

Currently there are no upcoming talks in this series.

 

Thursday Jan 05, 2012

Cold dark matter (CDM) is a central pillar of the current cosmological paradigm. While CDM

Collection/Series: 
Scientific Areas: 

 

Thursday Dec 15, 2011
Speaker(s): 
Collection/Series: 
Scientific Areas: 

 

Tuesday Dec 13, 2011
Speaker(s): 

I will discuss some work on the collider phenomenology and cosmology of light gravitino dark matter, and will touch on some related issues concerning infrared divergences in charged-particle decay at finite temperature.
Light gravitinos, with mass in the eV to MeV range, are well-motivated in particle physics, but their status as dark-matter candidates is muddled by early-Universe uncertainties.

Collection/Series: 
Scientific Areas: 

 

Thursday Dec 08, 2011
Speaker(s): 

I present a simple exactly solveable model of eternal inflation.  The correlation functions have a discrete analogue of conformal symmetry, which can be compactly expressed using the machinery of p-adic numbers.  I comment on the implications for actual cosmology, and in particular for holographic descriptions of eternal inflation.

Collection/Series: 
Scientific Areas: 

 

Tuesday Dec 06, 2011
Speaker(s): 

Supersymmetry plays a fundamental role in the radiative stability of many inflationary models.  I will explain how supersymmetry and naturalness require additional scalar degrees of freedom with masses on the order of the inflationary Hubble scale.  These fields lead to distinctive non-gaussian signatures that may be observable in both the CMB and large scale structure.

Collection/Series: 
Scientific Areas: 

 

Thursday Dec 01, 2011
Speaker(s): 

Hawking's discovery of black holes radiance along with Bekenstein's conjecture of the generalized second law of thermodynamics inspired a conceptually pleasing connection between gravity, thermodynamics and quantum theory. However, the discovery that the spectrum of the radiation is in fact thermal, together with the no-hair theorem, has brought along with it some undesirable consequences, most notably the information loss paradox.

Collection/Series: 
Scientific Areas: 

 

Tuesday Nov 29, 2011
Speaker(s): 

The advent of large spectroscopic surveys of galaxies in the early 1980s has shown us that galaxies assemble in large scale structures.
Recently, cosmic voids have received more attention through the availability wide and deep galaxy surveys. Voids have a simple phase space structure and thus are easier to model than cluster of galaxies.

Collection/Series: 
Scientific Areas: 

 

Tuesday Nov 22, 2011
Speaker(s): 

The study of the anisotropies in the cosmic microwave background radiation over the past two decades has provided us with important information about the early universe. In particular, there is strong evidence that these anisotropies were generated long before the cosmic microwave radiation was emitted. The most commonly studied idea is that they originated as quantum fluctuations during a period of inflation. In addition to a spectrum of scalar perturbations consistent with the one that has been observed, inflation also predicts the presence of gravitational waves.

Collection/Series: 
Scientific Areas: 

 

Tuesday Nov 15, 2011
Speaker(s): 

General relativity is a covariant theory of two transverse, traceless graviton degrees of freedom. According to a theorem of Hojman, Kuchar, and Teitelboim, modifications of general relativity must either introduce new degrees of freedom or violate the principle of general covariance. In my talk, I will discuss modifications of general relativity that retain the same number of gravitational degrees of freedom, and therefore explicitly break general covariance. Motivated by cosmology, the modifications of interest maintain spatial covariance.

Collection/Series: 
Scientific Areas: 

Pages