Many-Body States and Dynamics Workshop II

Conference Date: 
Thursday, June 13, 2019 (All day)
Scientific Areas: 
Condensed Matter

 

On Thursday, June 13 the Institute for Quantum Computing (IQC) and Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics (PI) will participate in the one-day Many-Body States and Dynamics Workshop II.

The goal of the workshop is to  describe ongoing efforts to experimentally realize quantum many-body states and dynamics, and discuss interesting classes of states and dynamics that could be targeted.

Experimentalists working on several platforms (such as photons, atom and ion traps, superconducting qubits, exciton-polaritons, or NMR) and theoreticians specialized in many-body theory (entanglement, topological order, gauge theories, criticality, chaos, error correction, holography) and numerical simulations (exact diagonalization, Monte Carlo, DMRG, tensor networks) will meet for a morning workshop to identify and discuss common interests.

Registration for this event is now closed.

  • Daniel Gottesman, Perimeter Institute
  • Timothy Hsieh, Perimeter Institute
  • Rajibul Islam, Institute for Quantum Computing
  • Na Young Kim, University of Waterloo
  • Ashley Milsted, Perimeter Institute
  • Crystal Senko, Institute for Quantum Computing
  • Guifre Vidal, Perimeter Institute
  • Chris Wilson, University of Waterloo
  • Stephen Bartlett, University of Sydney
  • Matthew Beach, Perimeter Institute
  • Marina Cortes, University of Edinburgh
  • Samuel Cree, Perimeter Institute
  • Matthew Day, Institute for Quantum Computing
  • Kiena Fana, Institute for Quantum Computing 
  • Steven Gassner, Institute for Quantum Computing
  • Diego Gutierrez Coronel, Perimeter Institute
  • Roland Hablützel, Institute for Quantum Computing
  • Lauren Hayward Sierens, Perimeter Institute & University of Waterloo
  • Angus Kan, Institute for Quantum Computing
  • Stefan Kühn, Perimeter Institute
  • Pei Jiang Low, University of Waterloo
  • Sonell Malik, Institute for Quantum Computing
  • Sainath Motlakunta, Institute for Quantum Computing
  • Fereshteh Rajabi, Perimeter Institute
  • Abhisek Sahu, Institute for Quantum Computing
  • Manas Sajjan, University of Waterloo
  • Ahmed Shalabi, University of Waterloo
  • Esha Swaroop, Institute for Quantum Computing

Thursday, June 13, 2019

Time

Event

Location

9:25 – 9:30am

Timothy Hsieh, Perimeter Institute
Welcome and Opening Remarks

Bob Room

9:30 – 9:45am

Guifre Vidal, Perimeter Institute
Simulating an expanding universe on Google's Bristlecone

Bob Room

9:45 – 10:00am

Timothy Hsieh, Perimeter Institute
Preparing Critical and Thermofield Double States on a Quantum Computer

Bob Room

10:00 – 10:15am

Ashley Milsted, Perimeter Institute
TensorNetwork: accelerating tensor network computations and improving the coding experience

Bob Room

10:15 – 10:30am

Daniel Gottesman, Perimeter Institute
Maximally sensitive sets of states

Bob Room

10:30 – 11:00am

Break

Bistro – 1st Floor

11:00 – 11:15am

Rajibul Islam, Institute for Quantum Computing
Quantum simulation of 2D and 3D spin models in a linear chain of ions

Bob Room

11:15 - 11:30am

Na Young Kim, University of Waterloo
Polariton Graph Network

Bob Room

11:30 – 11:45am

Crystal Senko, Institute for Quantum Computing
Lecture 7

Bob Room

11:45 – 12:00pm

Chris Wilson, University of Waterloo
Quantum Simulation of Lattice Field Theories with Microwave Photons

Bob Room

12:00 – 2:00pm

Lunch

Bistro – 2nd Floor

 

 

Daniel Gottesman, Perimeter Institute

Maximally sensitive sets of states

Coherent errors in a quantum system can, in principle, build up much more rapidly than incoherent errors, accumulating as the square of the number of qubits in the system rather than linearly.  I will characterize the types of channels that can exhibit such behavior and present a simple protocol that can detect and characterize coherent errors whenever they are present, no matter what their nature.  This allows us to identify coherent errors in gates and measurements to within a constant fraction of the maximum possible sensitivity to such errors.

Timothy Hsieh, Perimeter Institute

Preparing Critical and Thermofield Double States on a Quantum Computer

I will present an efficient variational approach for preparing highly entangled pure states as well as thermofield double states on a quantum computer.  The latter, in addition to being of interest in the holographic correspondence, enables an alternative approach for simulating thermal states without an external heat bath.

Rajibul Islam, Institute for Quantum Computing

Quantum simulation of 2D and 3D spin models in a linear chain of ions

Trapped ions are among the most advanced technology platforms for quantum information processing, in particular quantum simulation. However, ions are most readily trapped as a linear chain in radio-frequency traps, limiting their use to simulate higher dimensional quantum systems. In this talk, I'll describe an analog and an analog-digital hybrid [1] quantum simulation protocols to simulate programmable 2D and 3D spin models in a linear ion chain, by manipulating phonon-mediated long-ranged interactions between ion spins. The ability to dynamically engineer lattice geometries enables the investigation of a rich variety of physical phenomena such as spin frustration, topological states, and quantum quenches. 

[1] Rajabi et al., npj Quantum Information 5:32 (2019)

Na Young Kim, University of Waterloo

Polariton Graph Network

Ashley Milsted, Perimeter Institute

TensorNetwork: accelerating tensor network computations and improving the coding experience

Tensor networks are powerful computational tools, widely used in condensed matter physics, and increasingly in high-energy physics, with promising applications to machine learning problems. Developed in collaboration with Google and X, we present TensorNetwork: a new software package that makes it easier to code tensor network algorithms and, by using a framework like TensorFlow as a backend,  to accelerate computations using specialized hardware (GPUs, TPUs) and integrate tensor networks into machine-learning projects.

Guifre Vidal, Perimeter Institute

Simulating an expanding universe on Google's Bristlecone

I will describe a proposal to simulate MERA on Google's 72 qubit NISQ device known as Bristlecone, and explain how it can be the basis for simulating inflation in an early universe. Other applications of this proposal include benchmarking of the NISQ device, hybrid classical quantum optimizations and quantum machine learning.

Chris Wilson, University of Waterloo

Quantum Simulation of Lattice Field Theories with Microwave Photons

Using superconducting parametric cavities, we have demonstrated much of the toolbox of linear quantum optics, but also extended it by taking advantage of the strong nonlinearities of superconducting circuits.  In a set of experiments, we have used these parametric cavities as a platform for analog quantum simulation of lattice field theories.  Preliminary results already show the promise of the platform for this application.  For instance, a single device can simulate a number of different models, including topological and chiral models, in a flexible and programmable way.

 

Thursday Jun 13, 2019
Speaker(s): 

Using superconducting parametric cavities, we have demonstrated much of the toolbox of linear quantum optics, but also extended it by taking advantage of the strong nonlinearities of superconducting circuits. In a set of experiments, we have used these parametric cavities as a platform for analog quantum simulation of lattice field theories. Preliminary results already show the promise of the platform for this application. For instance, a single device can simulate a number of different models, including topological and chiral models, in a flexible and programmable way.

Scientific Areas: 

 

Thursday Jun 13, 2019
Speaker(s): 

 

Thursday Jun 13, 2019
Speaker(s): 

 

Thursday Jun 13, 2019
Speaker(s): 

Trapped ions are among the most advanced technology platforms for quantum information processing, in particular quantum simulation. However, ions are most readily trapped as a linear chain in radio-frequency traps, limiting their use to simulate higher dimensional quantum systems. In this talk, I'll describe an analog and an analog-digital hybrid [1] quantum simulation protocols to simulate programmable 2D and 3D spin models in a linear ion chain, by manipulating phonon-mediated long-ranged interactions between ion spins.

Scientific Areas: 

 

Thursday Jun 13, 2019
Speaker(s): 

Coherent errors in a quantum system can, in principle, build up much more rapidly than incoherent errors, accumulating as the square of the number of qubits in the system rather than linearly. I will characterize the types of channels that can exhibit such behavior and present a simple protocol that can detect and characterize coherent errors whenever they are present, no matter what their nature. This allows us to identify coherent errors in gates and measurements to within a constant fraction of the maximum possible sensitivity to such errors.

Scientific Areas: 

 

Thursday Jun 13, 2019
Speaker(s): 

Tensor networks are powerful computational tools, widely used in condensed matter physics, and increasingly in high-energy physics, with promising applications to machine learning problems. Developed in collaboration with Google and X, we present TensorNetwork: a new software package that makes it easier to code tensor network algorithms and, by using a framework like TensorFlow as a backend, to accelerate computations using specialized hardware (GPUs, TPUs) and integrate tensor networks into machine-learning projects.

Scientific Areas: 

 

Thursday Jun 13, 2019
Speaker(s): 

I will present an efficient variational approach for preparing highly entangled pure states as well as thermofield double states on a quantum computer. The latter, in addition to being of interest in the holographic correspondence, enables an alternative approach for simulating thermal states without an external heat bath.

Scientific Areas: 

 

Thursday Jun 13, 2019
Speaker(s): 

I will describe a proposal to simulate MERA on Google's 72 qubit NISQ device known as Bristlecone, and explain how it can be the basis for simulating inflation in an early universe. Other applications of this proposal include benchmarking of the NISQ device, hybrid classical quantum optimizations and quantum machine learning.

Scientific Areas: 

Scientific Organizers:

  • Timothy Hsieh, Perimeter Institute
  • Rajibul Islam, Institute for Quantum Computing