Video Library

Since 2002 Perimeter Institute has been recording seminars, conference talks, and public outreach events using video cameras installed in our lecture theatres.  Perimeter now has 7 formal presentation spaces for its many scientific conferences, seminars, workshops and educational outreach activities, all with advanced audio-visual technical capabilities.  Recordings of events in these areas are all available On-Demand from this Video Library and on Perimeter Institute Recorded Seminar Archive (PIRSA)PIRSA is a permanent, free, searchable, and citable archive of recorded seminars from relevant bodies in physics. This resource has been partially modelled after Cornell University's arXiv.org. 

  

 

Wednesday Mar 23, 2005
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Since the seminal discovery of the neutrino by Cowan and Reines in the late 1950's, intense experimental and theoretical effort has focused on the elucidation of neutrino properties and the role they play in elementary particle physics, astrophysics, and cosmology. Neutrinos are born in the fusion reactions powering our Sun and are thought to be the driving mechanism for supernova explosions. Neutrinos exist in copious amounts as the primordial afterglow of the Big Bang and, if massive, would play a role in the evolution and ultimate fate of the Universe.

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Wednesday Mar 16, 2005
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In this talk we assume that Quantum Einstein Gravity (QEG) is the correct theory of gravity on all length scales. We use both analytical results from nonperturbative renormalization group (RG) equations and experimental input in order to describe the special RG trajectory of QEG which is realized in Nature. We identify a regime of scales where gravitational physics is well described by classical General Relativity. Strong renormalization effects occur at both larger and smaller momentum scales. The former are related to the (conjectured) nonperturbative renormalizability of QEG.

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Thursday Mar 10, 2005
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Chameleon scalar fields are candidates for the dark energy, the mysterious component causing the observed acceleration of the universe. Their defining property is a mass which depends on the local matter density: they are massive on Earth, where the density is high, but essentially massless in the cosmos, where the density is much lower. All current constraints from tests of general relativity are satisfied. Nevertheless, chameleons lead to striking predictions for tests of gravity in the laboratory and in space.

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