Video Library

Since 2002 Perimeter Institute has been recording seminars, conference talks, public outreach events such as talks from top scientists using video cameras installed in our lecture theatres.  Perimeter now has 7 formal presentation spaces for its many scientific conferences, seminars, workshops and educational outreach activities, all with advanced audio-visual technical capabilities. 

Recordings of events in these areas are all available and On-Demand from this Video Library and on Perimeter Institute Recorded Seminar Archive (PIRSA)PIRSA is a permanent, free, searchable, and citable archive of recorded seminars from relevant bodies in physics. This resource has been partially modelled after Cornell University's arXiv.org. 

Accessibly by anyone with internet, Perimeter aims to share the power and wonder of science with this free library.

 

  

 

Tuesday May 28, 2013
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The decomposition of the magnetic moments in spin ice into freely moving magnetic monopoles has added a new dimension to the concept of fractionalization, showing that geometrical frustration, even in the absence of quantum fluctuations, can lead to the apparent reduction of fundamental objects into quasi particles of reduced dimension [1]. The resulting quasi-particles map onto a Coulomb gas in the grand canonical ensemble [2]. By varying the chemical potential one can drive the ground state from a vacuum to a monopole crystal with the Zinc blend structure [3].

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Tuesday May 28, 2013
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I shall give an introduction to conceptual ideas and equations of the CSL (Continuous Spontaneous Localization) theory of dynamical wave function collapse.  Then, I shall discuss various applications of the theory.

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Tuesday May 28, 2013
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The textbook collapse postulate says that, after a measurement, the quantum state of the system on which the measurement was performed , and becomes an eigenstate of the observable measured.

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Monday May 27, 2013
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Expressions of several information theoretic quantities involve an optimization over auxiliary quantum registers. Entanglement-assisted version of some classical communication problems provides examples of such expressions. Evaluating these expressions requires bounds on the dimension of these auxiliary registers. In the classical case such a bound can usually be obtained based on the

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Monday May 27, 2013
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Models of spontaneous wave function collapse make predictions, which are different from those of standard quantum mechanics. Indeed, these models can be considered as a rival theory, against which the standard theory can be tested, in pretty much the same way in which parametrized post-Newtonian gravitational theories are rival theories of general relativity.  The predictions of collapse models almost coincide with those of standard quantum mechanics at the microscopic level, as these models have to account for the microscopic world, as we know it.

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Monday May 27, 2013
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Monday May 27, 2013

I will present a recent theorem that asserts that there cannot exist an "extension of quantum theory" that allows us to make more informative predictions about future measurable events (e.g., whether a horizontally polarized photon passes a polarization filter with a given orientation) than standard quantum theory.

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Thursday May 23, 2013
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By way of presenting some classic and many new results, my talk will indulge shamelessly in
advertising "Causal Dynamical Triangulations (CDT)" as a hands-on approach to nonperturbative quantum gravity that reaches where other approaches currently don't. After summarizing the rationale and basic ingredients of CDT quantum gravity and some of its key findings (like the emergence of a classical de Sitter space), I will focus on some very recent results: how we uncovered the presence of a second-order phase transition (so far unique in 4D quantum

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