Video Library

Since 2002 Perimeter Institute has been recording seminars, conference talks, public outreach events such as talks from top scientists using video cameras installed in our lecture theatres.  Perimeter now has 7 formal presentation spaces for its many scientific conferences, seminars, workshops and educational outreach activities, all with advanced audio-visual technical capabilities. 

Recordings of events in these areas are all available and On-Demand from this Video Library and on Perimeter Institute Recorded Seminar Archive (PIRSA)PIRSA is a permanent, free, searchable, and citable archive of recorded seminars from relevant bodies in physics. This resource has been partially modelled after Cornell University's arXiv.org. 

Accessibly by anyone with internet, Perimeter aims to share the power and wonder of science with this free library.

 

  

 

Thursday Dec 05, 2013

Recently there has been a large growth of research effort for nanoelectronic devices.Investigations of quantumly coherent nano-meter scale systems whose fabrication has been made possible by recent advances in experimental and sample preparation techniques have revealed that transport properties could be non-Ohmic and G could be quantized. Understanding electron conduction in such devices is an extremely active research topic.

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Thursday Dec 05, 2013
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Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are known to be active against a wide range of microbes. Cell selectivity is an important quality of AMPs which enables them to preferentially bind to and kill the microbes over host cells. Despite its significance in determining the cell selectivity however the cell-concentration dependence of AMP activity has not been criticality examined. Here we present a coarse-grained model for describing how cell concentrations are implicated in AMP's membrane-perturbing activity and selectivity.

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Thursday Dec 05, 2013
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C. elegans is a millimeter-sized nematode which has served as a model organism in biology for several decades primarily due to its simple anatomy. Using an undulatory form of locomotion this worm is capable of propelling itself through various media. Due to the small length scales involved swimming in this regime is qualitatively different from macroscopic locomotion because the swimmers can be considered to have no inertia. In order to understand the microswimming that this worm exhibits it is crucial to determine the viscous forces experienced during its motion.

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Thursday Dec 05, 2013
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Undulatory motion is utilized by crawlers and swimmers such as snakes and sperm at length scales spanning more than seven orders of magnitude. The understanding of this highly efficient form of locomotion requires an experimental characterisation of the passive material properties of the organism as well as of its active force output on the surrounding medium. The millimeter-sized nematode Caenorhabditis elegans provides an excellent biophysical system for both static and dynamic biomechanical studies.

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Thursday Dec 05, 2013
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We simulated Ni disc immersed in a liquid crystal using a lattice Boltzmann algorithm for liquid crystals. In the absence of external torques discs with homeotropic anchoring align with their surface normal parallel to the director of the nematic liquid crystal. In the presence of a weak magnetic field (

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Thursday Dec 05, 2013
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The discovery of a perturbatively-coupled, 125 GeV Higgs, together with the absence of LHC signals for supersymmetry, places the principle of naturalness under tension. In this talk I will discuss the possibility that the weak scale is unnatural, with its value determined environmentally in the landscape. In particular, this environmental selection may be driven by BBN: as the weak scale is increased, the abundance of Hydrogen in the early universe is rapidly depleted.

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Thursday Dec 05, 2013
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In eukaryotic organisms, DNA replication is initiated at “origins,” launching “forks” that spread bidirectionally to replicate the genome. The distribution and firing rate of these origins and the fork progression velocity form the “replication program.” With Antoine Baker, I generalize a stochastic model of DNA replication to allow for space and time variations in origin-initiation rates, characterized by a function I(x,t). We then address the inverse problem of inferring I(x,t) from experimental data concerning replication in cell populations.

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Thursday Dec 05, 2013
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Spin foams provide models for quantum gravity and hence quantum space time. One of the key outstanding questions is to show that they reproduce smooth space time manifolds in a continuum limit.I will start with a very short introduction to spin foams and the structure of quantum space time they encode.

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Thursday Dec 05, 2013
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This talk will focus on the behavior of colloidal crystals, and will describe both the nucleation and growth of crystals and their melting. The nucleation and growth of colloidal crystals is experimentally observed to be much faster than expected theoretically or through simulation. The discrepancy can be as much as 10150! I will describe some new experiments that suggest a possible reason for this. I will also describe the melting of colloidal crystals formed with highly charged particles that form a Wigner lattice.

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