Video Library

Since 2002 Perimeter Institute has been recording seminars, conference talks, and public outreach events using video cameras installed in our lecture theatres.  Perimeter now has 7 formal presentation spaces for its many scientific conferences, seminars, workshops and educational outreach activities, all with advanced audio-visual technical capabilities.  Recordings of events in these areas are all available On-Demand from this Video Library and on Perimeter Institute Recorded Seminar Archive (PIRSA)PIRSA is a permanent, free, searchable, and citable archive of recorded seminars from relevant bodies in physics. This resource has been partially modelled after Cornell University's arXiv.org. 

  

 

Friday May 13, 2011
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We address the problem of testing the dimensionality of classical and quantum systems in a ‘black-box’ scenario. Imagine two uncharacterized devices. The first one allows an experimentalist to prepare a physical system in various ways. The second one allows the experimentalist to perform some measurement on the system. After collecting enough statistics, the experimentalist obtains a ‘data table’, featuring the probability distribution of the measurement outcomes for each choice of preparation (of the system) and of measurement.

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Friday May 13, 2011
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A seminal work by Cleve, Høyer, Toner and Watrous (quant-ph/0404076) proposed a close connection between quantum nonlocality and computational complexity theory by considering nonlocal games and multi-prover interactive proof systems with entangled provers. It opened up the whole area of study of the computational nature of nonlocality. Since then, understanding nonlocality has been one of the major goals in computational complexity theory in the quantum setting. This talk gives a survey of this exciting area.

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Friday May 13, 2011
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In this talk, I'll survey various "foils" of BQP (Bounded-Error Quantum Polynomial-Time) that have been proposed: that is, changes to the quantum model of computation that make it either more or less powerful.

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Friday May 13, 2011
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We discuss bulk and holographic features of black hole solutions of 4D anti de Sitter Einstein-Maxwell-Dilaton gravity. At finite temperature the field theory holographically dual to these solutions has a rich and interesting phenomenology reminiscent of electron motion in metals:
phase transitions triggered by nonvanishing VEV of scalar operators, non-monotonic behavior of the electric conductivities etc. Conversely, in the zero temperature limit the transport properties for these models show an universal behavior.

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Friday May 13, 2011
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Operational theories [1], defined in terms of the actions and observations of an experimenter, have been extremely successful as foils to quantum mechanics, providing a generic framework in which families of theories may be compared and classified. One area of particular interest has been in the non-classical correlations (often referred to non-locality) which can arise in quantum (and generalised) theories, when measurements are space-like separated. In the context of non-locality, one usually considers the correlations in separated measurements on isolated systems.

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Friday May 13, 2011

David Deutsch re-formulated the Church-Turing thesis as a physical principle, asserting that "every finitely realizable physical system can be perfectly simulated by a universal model computing machine operating by finite means". Such principle can be regarded as a new theoretical paradigm, whereby the entire Physics is emerging from a quantum computation. But for a theory to be a good one, it must explain a large class of phenomena based on few general principles.

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Thursday May 12, 2011
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A central question in our understanding of the physical world is how our knowledge of the whole relates to our knowledge of the individual parts. One aspect of this question is the following: to what extent does ignorance about a whole preclude knowledge of at least one of its parts? Relying purely on classical intuition, one would certainly be inclined to conjecture that a strong ignorance of the whole cannot come without significant ignorance of at least one of its parts. Indeed, we show that this reasoning holds in any non-contextual hidden variable model (NC-HV).

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Thursday May 12, 2011

We will explore generalisations of the Shannon and von Neumann entropy to other probabilistic theories, and their connection to the principle of information causality. We will also investigate the link between information causality and non-local games, leading to a new quantum bound on computing the inner product non-locally.

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Thursday May 12, 2011
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In 1964, John Bell proved that independent measurements on entangled quantum states lead to correlations that cannot be reproduced using local hidden variables. The core of his proof is that such distributions violate some logical constraints known as Bell inequalities. This remarkable result establishes the non-locality of quantum physics. Bell's approach is purely qualitative. This naturally leads to the question of quantifying quantum physics' non-locality. We will specifically consider two quantities introduced for this purpose.

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Thursday May 12, 2011
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We present “guess your neighbor input” (GYNI), a multipartite nonlocal task in which each player must guess the input received by his neighbor. We show that quantum correlations do not perform better than classical ones at this task, for any prior distribution of the inputs. There exist, however, input distributions for which general no-signalling correlations can outperform classical and quantum correlations. Some of the Bell inequalities associated to our construction correspond to facets of the local polytope.

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