Video Library

Since 2002 Perimeter Institute has been recording seminars, conference talks, and public outreach events using video cameras installed in our lecture theatres.  Perimeter now has 7 formal presentation spaces for its many scientific conferences, seminars, workshops and educational outreach activities, all with advanced audio-visual technical capabilities.  Recordings of events in these areas are all available On-Demand from this Video Library and on Perimeter Institute Recorded Seminar Archive (PIRSA)PIRSA is a permanent, free, searchable, and citable archive of recorded seminars from relevant bodies in physics. This resource has been partially modelled after Cornell University's arXiv.org. 

  

 

Tuesday Mar 23, 2010
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Stellar evolution from a protostar to neutron star is of one of the best
studied subjects in modern astrophysics. Yet, it appears that there is still
a lot to learn about the extreme conditions where the fundamental particle physics meets strong gravity regime. After all of the thermonuclear fuel is spent, and
after the supernova explosion, but before the remaining mass crosses its own
Schwarzschild radius, the temperature of the central core of the star might
become higher than the electroweak symmetry restoration temperature. The

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Tuesday Mar 23, 2010
Speaker(s): 

We will give a short overview of non-perturbative quantum gravity
models and discuss some key common problems for these models. In
particular we will analyze what background independence requires from
a theory of quantum gravity.

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Monday Mar 22, 2010
Speaker(s): 

The original motivation to build a quantum computer came from Feynman who envisaged a machine capable of simulating generic quantum mechanical systems, a task that is intractable for classical computers. Such a machine would have tremendous applications in all physical sciences, including condensed matter physics, chemistry, and high energy physics. Part of Feynman's challenge was met by Lloyd who showed how to approximately decompose the time-evolution operator of interacting quantum particles into a short sequence of elementary gates, suitable for operation on a quantum computer.

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