Video Library

Since 2002 Perimeter Institute has been recording seminars, conference talks, and public outreach events using video cameras installed in our lecture theatres.  Perimeter now has 7 formal presentation spaces for its many scientific conferences, seminars, workshops and educational outreach activities, all with advanced audio-visual technical capabilities.  Recordings of events in these areas are all available On-Demand from this Video Library and on Perimeter Institute Recorded Seminar Archive (PIRSA)PIRSA is a permanent, free, searchable, and citable archive of recorded seminars from relevant bodies in physics. This resource has been partially modelled after Cornell University's arXiv.org. 

  

 

Monday Aug 25, 2008
Speaker(s): 

We present a novel quantum tomographic reconstruction method based on Bayesian inference via the Kalman filter update equations. The method not only yields the maximum likelihood/optimal Bayesian reconstruction, but also a covariance matrix expressing the measurement uncertainties in a complete way. From this covariance matrix the error bars on any derived quantity can be easily calculated.

 

Monday Aug 25, 2008
Speaker(s): 

The experimental realization of entangled states requires tools for characterizing the produced states as well as the processes used for creating the entanglement. In my talk, I will present examples of quantum measurements occuring in trapped ion experiments aiming at creating high-fidelity quantum gates.

 

Monday Aug 25, 2008

A new approach to Quantum Estimation Theory will be introduced, based on the novel notions of \'quantum comb\' and \'quantum tester\', which generalize the customary notions of \'channel\' and \'POVM\' [PRL 101 060401 (2008)]. The new approach opens completely new possibilities of optimization in Quantum Estimation, beyond the classic approach of Helstrom and Holevo. Using comb theory it is possible to optimize the input-output arrangement of the black boxes for estimation with many uses.

 

Tuesday Aug 19, 2008
Speaker(s): 

The reason cosmologists have a job is that the Universe as a whole -- the stuff between planets and stars and galaxies -- is, despite first appearances, a pretty interesting place. The strangest fact about it is that it\'s expanding, and always has been, as far as we know (and though Einstein\'s theory of gravity predicts this, Albert himself didn\'t much care for the idea, at least at first). After about seventy years -- it was discovered in 1929 -- this expansion was kind of old hat, but then new observations came around that shattered the old complacency.

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Tuesday Aug 19, 2008
Speaker(s): 

The reason cosmologists have a job is that the Universe as a whole -- the stuff between planets and stars and galaxies -- is, despite first appearances, a pretty interesting place. The strangest fact about it is that it's expanding, and always has been, as far as we know (and though Einstein's theory of gravity predicts this, Albert himself didn't much care for the idea, at least at first). After about seventy years -- it was discovered in 1929 -- this expansion was kind of old hat, but then new observations came around that shattered the old complacency.

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Monday Aug 18, 2008
Speaker(s): 

One simple way to think about physics is in terms of information. We gain information about physical systems by observing them, and with luck this data allows us to predict what they will do next. Quantum mechanics doesn\'t just change the rules about how physical objects behave - it changes the rules about how information behaves. In this talk we explore what quantum information is, and how strangely it differs from our intuitions.

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Monday Aug 18, 2008
Speaker(s): 

One simple way to think about physics is in terms of information. We gain information about physical systems by observing them, and with luck this data allows us to predict what they will do next. Quantum mechanics doesn't just change the rules about how physical objects behave - it changes the rules about how information behaves. In this talk we explore what quantum information is, and how strangely it differs from our intuitions.

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Saturday Aug 16, 2008
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Saturday Aug 16, 2008
Speaker(s): 

A “derivation” of the Schrodinger wave equation based on simple calculus.

Learning Outcomes:

• How to express the de Broglie wave of a free particle, i.e. a complex traveling wave, in terms of the particle’s energy and momentum, and how to differentiate this wave with respect to its space and time variables (x and t).

• How to combine the above mathematical results with the Newtonian expression for the total energy of a particle to get Schrodinger’s wave equation.

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