Video Library

Since 2002 Perimeter Institute has been recording seminars, conference talks, and public outreach events using video cameras installed in our lecture theatres.  Perimeter now has 7 formal presentation spaces for its many scientific conferences, seminars, workshops and educational outreach activities, all with advanced audio-visual technical capabilities.  Recordings of events in these areas are all available On-Demand from this Video Library and on Perimeter Institute Recorded Seminar Archive (PIRSA)PIRSA is a permanent, free, searchable, and citable archive of recorded seminars from relevant bodies in physics. This resource has been partially modelled after Cornell University's arXiv.org. 

  

 

Tuesday Oct 28, 2008
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The Dark Energy might constitute an observable fraction of the total energy density of our Universe as far back as the time of matter radiation equality or even big bang nucleosynthesis. In this talk, I will review the cosmological implications of such an \'Early Dark Energy\' component, and discuss how it might - or might not - be detected by observations. In particular, I will show how assuming the early dark energy to be negligible will bias the interpretation of cosmological data.

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Tuesday Oct 28, 2008
Speaker(s): 

Abstract: Complete sets of mutually unbiased bases are clearly \'cousins\' of SICs. One difference is that there is a \'theory\' for MUBs, in the sense that they are straightforward to construct in some cases, and probably impossible to construct in others. Moreover complete sets of MUBs do appear naturally in the algebraic geometry of projective space (in particular they come from elliptic curves with certain symmetries). I will describe some unsuccessful attempts I have made to go from MUBs to SICs.

 

Monday Oct 27, 2008
Speaker(s): 

I present three realizations about the SIC problem which excited me several years ago but which did not - unsurprisingly - lead anywhere. 1. In odd dimensions d, the metaplectic representation of SL(2,Z_d) decomposes into two irreducible components, acting on the odd and even parity subspaces respectively. It follows that if a fiducial vector | Psi> possesses some Clifford-symmetry, the same is already true for both its even and its odd parity components |Psi_e>, |Psi_o>. What is more, these components have potentially a larger symmetry group than their sum.

 

Monday Oct 27, 2008
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As a means of exactly derandomizing certain quantum information processing tasks, unitary designs have become an important concept in quantum information theory. A unitary design is a collection of unitary matrices that approximates the entire unitary group, much like a spherical design approximates the entire unit sphere. We use irreducible representations of the unitary group to find a general lower bound on the size of a unitary t-design in U(d), for any d and t.

 

Monday Oct 27, 2008
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Abstract: Adapting the concept of Wigner functions to finite dimensional systems is no simple matter. Basic issues with existing proposals are that they are either over-complete in the sense that the degrees of freedom in the Wigner function does not match the degrees of freedom in the original density matrix, or that they work only for restricted dimensions, namely for prime powers. We propose a new way to define a Wigner function and associated quantum phase space for some non-prime power dimensions.

 

Sunday Oct 26, 2008
Speaker(s): 

By definition, SIC-POVMs are symmetric in the sense that the magnitude of the inner product between any pair of vectors is constant. All known constructions are based on additional symmetries, mainly with respect to the Weyl-Heisenberg group. Analyzing solutions for small dimensions, Zauner has identified an additional symmetry of order three and conjectured that these symmetries can be used to construct SIC-POVMs for all dimensions. Appleby has confirmed that all numerical solutions of Renes et al. indeed have that additional symmetry.

 

Friday Oct 24, 2008
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One of the most challenging problems in theoretical physics today is the so called cosmological constant problem. While current observational constraints are consistent with the predictions of GR with a tiny cosmological constant, often referred to as the dark energy, it remains possible that it\'s the deviation of the law of gravity at large distance from Einstein\'s theory that resolves the puzzle.

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