Video Library

Since 2002 Perimeter Institute has been recording seminars, conference talks, and public outreach events using video cameras installed in our lecture theatres.  Perimeter now has 7 formal presentation spaces for its many scientific conferences, seminars, workshops and educational outreach activities, all with advanced audio-visual technical capabilities.  Recordings of events in these areas are all available On-Demand from this Video Library and on Perimeter Institute Recorded Seminar Archive (PIRSA)PIRSA is a permanent, free, searchable, and citable archive of recorded seminars from relevant bodies in physics. This resource has been partially modelled after Cornell University's arXiv.org. 

  

 

Wednesday Sep 17, 2008
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I will report on efforts to implement a new method for simulating concatenated quantum error correction, where many levels of concatenation are simulated together explicitly. That is, the approach involves a Monte Carlo simulation of a noisy circuit involving many thousands of qubits, rather than tens of qubits previously. The new approach allows the threshold and resource usage of concatenated quantum error correction to be determined more accurately than before.

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Wednesday Sep 17, 2008
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Quantum Field Theory I course taught by Volodya Miransky of the University of Western Ontario

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Wednesday Sep 17, 2008
Speaker(s): 

Quantum Field Theory I course taught by Volodya Miransky of the University of Western Ontario

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Tuesday Sep 16, 2008
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We will discuss the missing pieces in the understanding of the effective field theory description of string creation, the T-dual of the Hanany-Witten effect, both in the open and closed string picture. We explain the origin of the \'bare\' Chern-Simons term, so far added in by hand. There however remain unsettled issues concerning the need to modify the DBI action and the interpretation of this term in M-theory.

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Friday Sep 12, 2008
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The idea behind the \'Open Science Movement\' is that by making data, results, and protocols freely available to the research community for use and re-use a step change in the efficiency of carrying out science can be achieved. In this talk I will discuss the experience of my research group in pursuing \'Open Notebook Science\' in which we make our laboratory notebooks freely available on the web as experiments are recorded.

 

Friday Sep 12, 2008
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Computation is increasingly important in all branches of science, but most scientists have no idea how reliable their software is, and cannot reproduce even their own computational results if more than a few weeks have passed. \'Live on the web\' labs and other new ideas promise to change this, but face an uphill battle against entrenched practices and institutional lethargy. This talk looks at how we got into this mess, what could get us out of it, and how likely scientists are to actually embrace change.

 

Thursday Sep 11, 2008
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How can we best take advantage of the internet to improve how science is done? Much attention has been paid to open access and open data as enablers of online innovation. In this talk, I discuss the complementary issue of cultural openness in science, and argue that a relatively closed culture is inhibiting online innovation in science. I\'ll discuss ways this culture may be changed, and what opportunities may result.

 

Thursday Sep 11, 2008
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Three revolutions are coming together to shift people\'s social lives away from tight-knit family and neighborhood relationships towards more far-flung, less tight, more diverse personal networks. The internet revolution, the mobile revolution, and the social network revolution are producing a new societal reality we call \'networked individualism.\' Analysts argue over whether this leads to social decay or utopia; we argue instead that social change is occurring that has both benefits and drawbacks.

 

Thursday Sep 11, 2008

This course is aimed at advanced undergraduate and beginning graduate students, and is inspired by a book by the same title, written by Padmanabhan. Each session consists of solving one or two pre-determined problems, which is done by a randomly picked student. While the problems introduce various subjects in Astrophysics and Cosmology, they do not serve as replacement for standard courses in these subjects, and are rather aimed at educating students with hands-on analytic/numerical skills to attack new problems.

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