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Video Library

Since 2002 Perimeter Institute has been recording seminars, conference talks, and public outreach events using video cameras installed in our lecture theatres.  Perimeter now has 7 formal presentation spaces for its many scientific conferences, seminars, workshops and educational outreach activities, all with advanced audio-visual technical capabilities.  Recordings of events in these areas are all available On-Demand from this Video Library and on Perimeter Institute Recorded Seminar Archive (PIRSA)PIRSA is a permanent, free, searchable, and citable archive of recorded seminars from relevant bodies in physics. This resource has been partially modelled after Cornell University's arXiv.org. 

  

 

 

 

Thursday Nov 23, 2017
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Compatibility of asymptotic safety with UV-completions of matter theories may constrain the underlying microscopic dynamics of quantum gravity. Within truncated RG-flows, a weak-gravity bound originates from the loss of quantum scale-invariance in the matter system. Further constraints could arise when linking Planck-scale to electroweak-scale dynamics. Within the constrained region, gravitationally induced scale-invariance could UV-complete the Standard Model, and moreover explain free parameters such as fermion masses and gauge couplings.

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Thursday Nov 23, 2017

I will describe the recently developed bimetric theory of fractional quantum Hall states. It is an effective theory that includes the Chern-Simons term that describes the topological properties of the fractional quantum Hall state, and a non-linear, a la bimetric massive gravity action that describes gapped Girvin-MacDonald-Platzman mode at long wavelengths.

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Wednesday Nov 22, 2017
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Quantum error correction -- originally invented for quantum computing -- has proven itself useful in a variety of non-computational physical systems, as the ideas of QEC are broadly applicable.

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Wednesday Nov 22, 2017
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Our sense of smell is extraordinarily good at molecular recognition: we can identify tens of thousands of odorants unerringly over a wide concentration range. The mechanism by which this happens is still hotly debated. One view is that molecular shape governs smell, but this notion has turned out to have very little predictive power. Some years ago I revived a discredited theory that posits instead that the nose is a vibrational spectroscope, and proposed a possible underlying mechanism, inelastic electron tunneling.

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Wednesday Nov 22, 2017
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