Video Library

Since 2002 Perimeter Institute has been recording seminars, conference talks, public outreach events such as talks from top scientists using video cameras installed in our lecture theatres.  Perimeter now has 7 formal presentation spaces for its many scientific conferences, seminars, workshops and educational outreach activities, all with advanced audio-visual technical capabilities. 

Recordings of events in these areas are all available and On-Demand from this Video Library and on Perimeter Institute Recorded Seminar Archive (PIRSA)PIRSA is a permanent, free, searchable, and citable archive of recorded seminars from relevant bodies in physics. This resource has been partially modelled after Cornell University's arXiv.org. 

Accessibly by anyone with internet, Perimeter aims to share the power and wonder of science with this free library.

 

  

 

 

Wednesday Dec 09, 2020
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Aaronson and Ambainis (2009) and Chailloux (2018) showed that fully symmetric (partial) functions do not admit exponential quantum query speedups. This raises a natural question: how symmetric must a function be before it cannot exhibit a large quantum speedup? In this work, we prove that hypergraph symmetries in the adjacency matrix model allow at most a polynomial separation between randomized and quantum query complexities.

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Wednesday Dec 09, 2020
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The Event Horizon Telescope is a global effort to construct an
Earth-sized virtual radio telescope array, with the goal to make pictures and
movies of two nearby supermassive black holes. A detailed theoretical
understanding of black hole accretion is now crucial to interpret these
observations. I will review our current efforts to model polarimetric
properties of light produced in synchrotron processes in plasma falling
towards the event horizon. The numerical models are based on general

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Wednesday Dec 09, 2020
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In this talk, I will discuss two problems: quantum data compression
and quantum causal order discovery, both for multipartite quantum
systems. For data compression, we model finitely correlated states as
tensor networks, and design quantum compression algorithms. We first
establish an upper bound on the amount of memory needed to store an
arbitrary state from a given state family. The bound is determined by
the minimum cut of a suitable flow network, and is related to the flow

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Tuesday Dec 08, 2020
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The Dark Energy Survey (DES) is a photometric galaxy survey which, using measurements of distortions to galaxy shapes from weak gravitational lensing and other observables, we can use to test the validity of our standard cosmological model, LambdaCDM. As an example of this, I will motivate and discuss a recent analysis of the DES Year 1 data (described in https://arxiv.org/abs/2010.05924) in which we use a "growth-geometry split" parameterization to check the consistency of constraints from structure growth and expansion history.

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Tuesday Dec 08, 2020
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Dilaton-gravity models are integrable in two dimensions and admit a holographic description. In this talk, the holographic description of the Dilaton-gravity in flat spacetime is discussed. Using the gauge theory formulation of the model we obtain the boundary action which under certain boundary conditions is of the Warped-Schwarzian type. We calculate the 1-loop partition function of the model as the coadjoint orbit of the warped Virasoro group.

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Tuesday Dec 08, 2020
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In the conventional weakly-interacting massive particle (WIMP) paradigm the late-time density of dark matter (DM) is set by the rate of two-body annihilations, but there has been considerable recent interest in exploring alternative DM scenarios where other interactions control the final abundance. I will show that by fully exploring the parameter space of a simple, weakly-coupled dark sector, we can find a rich set of novel pathways which lead to the observed relic density of DM.

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Tuesday Dec 08, 2020
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Torsion is a popular ingredient in gravity, yet fraught with quantum and classical pathologies. I develop a novel torsion theory, consistent with power-counting and unitarity. The Friedmann equations emerge (with dark energy and radiation), as do pp waves and the Schwarzschild vacuum, all without an Einstein-Hilbert term. I show that cosmology sees torsion as a non-canonical scalar, revealing a rich phenomenology of conformal or waterfall inflatons, and cuscutons. I finally argue that future work will be driven less by toy-models, and more by computer surveys.

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Monday Dec 07, 2020
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A many-body quantum system that is continually monitored by an external observer may be in distinct dynamical phases, depending on whether or not the observer’s repeated local measurements prevent the buildup of long-range entanglement. The universal properties of the “measurement phase transitions” between these phases remain a challenge. In this talk I will describe new theoretical approaches to measurement phase transitions, making connections with problems in statistical mechanics such as disordered magnets and travelling waves.

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Thursday Dec 03, 2020
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We introduce the notions of (G,q)-opers and Miura (G,q)-opers, where G is a simply-connected complex simple Lie group, and prove some general results about their structure. We then establish a one-to-one correspondence between the set of (G,q)-opers of a certain kind and the set of nondegenerate solutions of a system of XXZ Bethe Ansatz equations. This can be viewed as a generalization of the so-called quantum/classical duality which I studied with D. Gaiotto several years ago. q-Opers generalize classical side, while on the quantum side we have more general XXZ Bethe Ansatz equations.

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