Colloquium

This series covers all areas of research at Perimeter Institute, as well as those outside of PI's scope.

Seminar Series Events/Videos

TBA
Jan 9 2019 - 2:00pm
Room #: 294
Speaker(s):
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Feb 6 2019 - 2:00pm
Room #: 294
Speaker(s):
Scientific Areas:
 

 

Wednesday Oct 24, 2018
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The basic geometry of the Solar System - the shapes, spacings, and

orientations of the planetary orbits - has long been a subject of

fascination as well as inspiration for planet-formation theories. For

exoplanetary systems, those same properties have only recently come

into focus. I will review our current knowledge of the occurrence of

planets around other stars, their orbital distances and

eccentricities, the orbital spacings and mutual inclinations in

multiplanet systems, the orientation of the host star's rotation axis,

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Wednesday Oct 17, 2018
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I will discuss the status and future of numerical lattice Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) calculations for nuclear physics. With advances in supercomputing, we are beginning to quantitatively understand nuclear structure and interactions directly from the fundamental quark and gluon degrees of freedom of the Standard Model. Recent studies provide insight into the neutrino-nucleus interactions relevant to long-baseline neutrino experiments, double beta decay, and nuclear sigma terms needed for theory predictions of dark matter cross-sections at underground detectors.

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Wednesday Oct 10, 2018
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While the term “wide-field telescope” might sound like an oxymoron, a strong argument can be made that wide-field instruments lie behind much of the success of Canadian astronomy. Furthermore, despite the large size of the optical-IR community in Canada, this success has been made possible by considering multiple wavelength windows, from gamma to radio, and access to a suite of facilities.

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Wednesday Oct 03, 2018
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Recently there have been several proposals of low-energy precision experiments that can search for new particles, new forces, and the Dark Matter of the Universe in a way that is complementary to collider searches. In this talk, I will present some examples involving atomic clocks, nuclear magnetic resonance, and astrophysical black holes accessible to LIGO.

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Wednesday May 09, 2018
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The general purpose computer can run any program we can express in
symbolic logic; that makes it the go-to tool for accomplishing any task
that can be reduced to a computable function, and that's why software is
eating the world and cars and colliders and airplanes and pacemakers and
toasters are all just turning into computers in fancy cases.

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Wednesday Apr 25, 2018
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The surprising success of learning with deep neural networks poses two fundamental challenges: understanding why these networks work so well and what this success tells us about the nature of intelligence and our biological brain. Our recent Information Theory of Deep Learning shows that large deep networks achieve the optimal tradeoff between training size and accuracy, and that this optimality is achieved through the noise in the learning process.

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Wednesday Mar 14, 2018
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Quantum field theories play an important role in many condensed matter systems for their description at low energies and long length scales. In 1+1 dimensional critical systems the energy spectrum and the spectrum of scaling dimensions are intimately related in the presence of conformal symmetry. In higher space-time dimensions this relation is more subtle and not well explored numerically. In this talk we motivate and review our recent effort to characterize 2+1 dimensional quantum field theories using computational techniques 2+targetting the energy spectrum on a spatial torus.

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Wednesday Mar 07, 2018
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Red supergiants (RSGs) are the helium-fusing evolved descendants of moderately massive (10-25Mo) stars, the result of a near-horizontal evolution across the top of the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram following their time on the main sequence. As the coldest and largest (in physical size) members of the massive star population, these stars represent a significant evolutionary extreme and serve as ideal "magnifying glasses" for scrutinizing our current understanding of massive stars and their role in the universe.

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Thursday Feb 22, 2018
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We are fortunate to live in an era of great discoveries in particle physics and cosmology, and most of the theoretical understanding that made this possibile is based on effective field theories. In this talk, I will show how these powerful techniques can be applied across the spectrum of theoretical physics, and allow us to draw unexpected connections among very different systems. To illustrate this, I will discuss two interesting but very different phenomena, and show how they can both be described using a point-like particle effective theory.

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Thursday Feb 22, 2018
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Two seemingly different quantum field theories may secretly describe the same underlying physics — a phenomenon known as “duality”. Duality has been proved powerful in condensed matter physics, since many difficult questions can be drastically simplified in certain “dual” pictures. This is especially valuable for strongly interacting many-body problems, for which traditional tools (such as perturbation theory) are often not applicable. 

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