Colloquium

This series covers all areas of research at Perimeter Institute, as well as those outside of PI's scope.

Seminar Series Events/Videos

Currently there are no upcoming talks in this series.

 

Wednesday Apr 20, 2005
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Superconducting circuits based on Josephson junctions are promising candidates for the implementation of solid-state qubits. In most of the recent experiments on these circuits, the qubits are controlled by a classical field containing a large number of photons. The possibility of coherently coupling these systems to a single photon has been recently suggested, opening the possibility to study analogs of quantum optics in condensed matter systems.

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Wednesday Apr 06, 2005
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A key issue in the context of (compact) extra dimensions is the one of their stability. Any stabilization mechanism is effective only up to some given energy scale; if they can approach this energy, 4$d observers can excite the fluctuations of the internal space, and probe its existence. Stabilization mechanisms introduce fields in the internal space; perturbations of these fields are mixed with perturbations of the metric, so that their study requires a complete GR treatment. After presenting the general framework, I will then discuss some relevant applications.

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Wednesday Mar 23, 2005
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Since the seminal discovery of the neutrino by Cowan and Reines in the late 1950's, intense experimental and theoretical effort has focused on the elucidation of neutrino properties and the role they play in elementary particle physics, astrophysics, and cosmology. Neutrinos are born in the fusion reactions powering our Sun and are thought to be the driving mechanism for supernova explosions. Neutrinos exist in copious amounts as the primordial afterglow of the Big Bang and, if massive, would play a role in the evolution and ultimate fate of the Universe.

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Wednesday Mar 16, 2005
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In this talk we assume that Quantum Einstein Gravity (QEG) is the correct theory of gravity on all length scales. We use both analytical results from nonperturbative renormalization group (RG) equations and experimental input in order to describe the special RG trajectory of QEG which is realized in Nature. We identify a regime of scales where gravitational physics is well described by classical General Relativity. Strong renormalization effects occur at both larger and smaller momentum scales. The former are related to the (conjectured) nonperturbative renormalizability of QEG.

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Wednesday Mar 09, 2005
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The existence, and enigmatic nature, of 'Dark Energy' is one of the biggest theoretical upsets of recent times. In this seminar we present ideas on alternative theoretical and phenomenological approaches to the Dark Energy problem, in particular the issue of whether dark energy is a matter or gravity-based phenomenon, and the ways in which such approaches can been constrained and guided by observation. We also focus on some of the exciting future approaches that could provide unprecedented insights into the fundamentals of Dark Energy

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