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Particle Physics

This series consists of talks in the areas of Particle Physics, High Energy Physics & Quantum Field Theory.

Seminar Series Events/Videos

Currently there are no upcoming talks in this series.

 

Mardi oct 16, 2012
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With the discovery of a new Higgs-like particle at the LHC, there is an
unprecedented opportunity to use the Higgs as a probe for physics beyond the
Standard Model. I will discuss a variety of recent ideas to look for new
physics via the Higgs, including measurements of Higgs couplings and associated
indirect observables; searches for Higgs production in association with new
physics; and strategies for probing extended electroweak symmetry breaking
sectors.

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Mardi oct 02, 2012
Speaker(s): 

The
phenomenological Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (pMSSM) provides a broad
perspective on supersymmetric phenomenology. We have generated two large sets
of pMSSM models with neutralino and gravitino LSPs, with sparticle masses
extending up to 4 TeV. In this talk, I will discuss the implications of
searches for supersymmetry and the Higgs, with particular attention to
naturalness. In particular, we find that while sparticle spectra with
moderately light stops are still allowed, such stops are difficult to find

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Mardi sep 18, 2012
Speaker(s): 

The LHC detectors are allowing experimentalists to look
"inside" of jets and study the properties of these. Jet substructure
gives us the tools to study  boosted resonances that decay into jets. In
this talk, I will discuss an extension of substructure techniques to beyond the
Standard Model signals where reconstructing resonances may not be optimal, but
these techniques still allow us to pick out these signals from a busy QCD
environment.

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Mardi mai 29, 2012
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Precision timepieces are marvels of human ingenuity. Over the past half-a-century, precision time-keeping has been carried out with atomic clocks. I will review a novel and rapidly developing class of atomic clocks, optical lattice clocks. At their projected accuracy level, these would neither lose nor gain a fraction of a second over estimated age of the Universe. In other words, if someone were to build such a clock at the Big Bang and if such a timepiece were to survive the 14 billion years, the clock would be off by no more than a mere second.

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Mardi mai 22, 2012
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A beautiful understanding of the smallness of the neutrino masses may be obtained via the seesaw mechanism, whereby one takes advantage of the key qualitative distinction between the neutrinos and the other fermions: right-handed neutrinos are gauge singlets, and may therefore have large Majorana masses. The standard seesaw mechanism, however, does not address the apparent lack of hierarchy in the neutrino masses compared to the quarks and charged leptons, nor the large leptonic mixing angles compared to the small angles of the CKM matrix.

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Mardi avr 24, 2012
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The IceCube neutrino observatory is the world's largest high-energy neutrino telescope, utilizing the deep Antarctic ice as the Cherenkov detector medium.  In December 2010 the last of the observatory's 86 strings of optical detectors was deployed, completing the approximate cubic-kilometer array.   With the addition of a low-energy extension, called DeepCore, the observatory has very high neutrino detection efficiency for energies ranging from ~10 GeV to a few EeV.  The low-energy threshold establishes the first steps towards precision neutrino measurements in the Antarctic.

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Mardi avr 17, 2012
Speaker(s): 

Direct dark matter (DM) detection experiments almost always focus on Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs), which have a mass in the 1--1000 GeV range.  However, what if DM is not a WIMP?  In this talk, new direct detection strategies for DM particles with MeV to GeV mass will be presented.  In this largely unexplored mass range, DM can scatter with electrons, causing ionization of atoms in a detector target material and leading to single- or few-electron events.  I will present the first direct detection limits on DM as light as a few MeV, using XENON10 data.

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Mardi avr 10, 2012
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During the last ten years, a lot of experimental information has been collected from neutrino oscillation experiments  on the masses and and mixings among the three known  neutrino species. This presents  an almost comparable flavor picture for leptons as is already known to exist for quarks. In the talk I would like to discuss what these results imply for physics beyond the standard model since SM predicts zero neutrino mass.

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Mardi mar 27, 2012
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Models with right-handed currents have recently attracted attention because of their potential ability to solve the discrepancy in various determinations of |V_{ub}|. We consider a minimal setup with an SU(2)_L x SU(2)_R x U(1)_{B-L} gauge symmetry, for which we perform a simultaneous analysis of the most important constraints from electroweak precision observables, particle anti-particle mixing and the B -> X_{s,d} gamma decays.

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Mardi mar 20, 2012
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The axion provides a solution to the strong CP problem and is a cold dark matter candidate.  I'll briefly review the limits on the axion from particle physics, stellar evolution and cosmology.  The various constraints suggest that the axion mass is in the micro-eV to milli-eV range.  In this window, axions contribute significantly to the energy density of the universe in the form of cold dark matter.  It was recently found that dark matter axions thermalize and form a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC).  As a result, it may be possible to distinguish axions from other forms of dark matter, suc

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