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Particle Physics

This series consists of talks in the areas of Particle Physics, High Energy Physics & Quantum Field Theory.

Seminar Series Events/Videos

Currently there are no upcoming talks in this series.

 

Mardi déc 16, 2008

What does vacuum decay look like in an inflating, de Sitter, spacetime? Is it predominantly a quantum process of tunneling through the barrier, or a thermal process of tunneling over the barrier?

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Jeudi déc 04, 2008
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Recent experimental results seem to require a dramatic change in our view of the dark matter sector. In this talk I will describe the reasons for this change and the ingredients required to describe the new data. I will present possible field theories that give rise to such phenomena and delineate the resulting collider signatures.

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Vendredi nov 28, 2008
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Recent PAMELA and ATIC results may represent a breakthrough in dark matter searches beyond its gravitational imprint. After briefly reviewing the possible (classes of) explanations for the observed excesses in positron and electron cosmic ray fluxes I will focus on a two component dark matter model that may provide an explanation for large boost factors needed in the dark matter annihilation interpretation of the signals.

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Vendredi oct 31, 2008
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The interpretation of virtual gluons as ghosts in the non-linear gluonic structure of QCD permits the formulation and realization of a manifestly gauge-invariant and Lorentz covariant theory of interacting quarks/antiquarks, for all values of coupling.

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Vendredi mai 02, 2008
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Explorations of the possibility that the quark masses, and more generally the particle mass spectra, could be dynamically generated in the context of massless QCD will be presented. The basic idea is that the large degeneracy of the free massless QCD could lead to a large quark condensate and its corresponding mass. Under the presence of this very massive quark, the other five ones could acquire smaller masses as argued by Fritzsch in his Democratic Symmetry Breaking scheme.

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Lundi avr 14, 2008
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How sure are you that spacetime is continuous? One of the more radical approaches to quantum gravity, causal set theory, models spacetime as a discrete structure: a causal set. Allowing the possibility that spacetime is discrete then how should we do physics on it? Carrying over the usual continuum descriptions in terms of differential equations seems like a difficult option. This talk begins with a brief introduction to causal sets then describes an approach to modelling the propagation of scalar particles on a causal set.

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Mardi jan 15, 2008
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I shall review the potential relevance of antisymmetric tensor fields in physics, perhaps the most intriguing being a massive antisymmetric tensor as dark matter. Next, based on the most general quadratic action for the antisymmetric tensor field, I shall discuss what are possible extensions of Einstein\\\'s theory which include antisymmetric tensor field and thus torsion in a dynamical fashion.

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Lundi nov 05, 2007
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If some form of string theory indeed describes the ultra high energy physics of our universe, then there are two ingredients which are very likely to remain at low energies. The first, is a fifth force in the form of an additional abelian gauge group. The second, and more dramatic, is supersymmetry. Both may be observed at the upcoming Large Hadron Collider. In this talk I will explore a possible intimate connection between these two ingredients which leads to surprising predictions.

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Vendredi juil 07, 2006
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Currently, most physicists believe that only a small fraction of all the matter and energy in the universe is visible and can be seen through our most powerful telescopes. The remaining majority of the universe is thought to consist of elusive dark matter and dark energy, two substances about which we know very little. This presentation will explore the evidence in supporting the dark matter and dark energy theories and discuss some of their implications for how our universe will evolve.

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