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Compute Ontario Research Day 2014

Conference Date: 
Mercredi, Mai 7, 2014 (All day)
Pirsa Collection: 
Scientific Areas: 
Other

 

Formerly known as SHARCNET's Research Day, this event has been expanded for 2014 and is expected to be the premier annual event where Ontario researchers meet to learn about each other's High Performance Computing (HPC) related research. This includes both research performed via HPC as a science tool, as well as research regarding HPC itself. Research Day welcomes everybody, not just participants from Ontario.

Compute Ontario Research Day will be held on May 7, 2014, at the Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics in Waterloo, Ontario, Canada. We anticipate oral presentations of 20 minutes, with select presentations of 30 minutes. There will be a poster session as well.  Saul Teukolsky (Cornell University) has graciously agreed to deliver a keynote presentation.

As a geographically local meeting, Research Day is an excellent opportunity for students to advertise their projects. We anticipate offering a prize for best student presentation and/or best student poster. 

To register for this event, click here

Sponsorship for this conference has been provided by:

 

  • Nasser Mohieddin Abukhdeir, University of Waterloo
  • Adrian Adamescu, University of Waterloo
  • Alena Antipova, University of Western Ontario
  • Bill Appelbe, Orion
  • Sadegh Babaii Kochekseraii, Sheridan College
  • Shyam Badu, Wilfrid Laurier University
  • Michael Bauer, University of Western Ontario
  • Eric Bembenek, University of Waterloo
  • James Bergstra, University of Waterloo
  • Wilson Brenna, University of Waterloo
  • Alan Campopiano, Brock University
  • Charles Davis, Brock University
  • Hendrick de Haan, University of Ontario Institute of Technology
  • James Desjardins, Brock University
  • Antoine Dumont, York University
  • Dalibor Dvorski, Wilfrid Laurier University
  • Ahmed Elshamli, University of Guelph
  • Lawrence Folland, University of Waterloo
  • Simon Forest, Institute of Quantum Computing
  • Fred Fu, University of Waterloo
  • Marcial Garbanzo-Salas, University of Western Ontario
  • Abbas Ghasemi, University of Waterloo
  • Ali Ghasemi, McMaster University
  • Abby Goodrum, Wilfrid Laurier University
  • Stephen Green, University of Guelph
  • Daniel Gruner, University of Toronto
  • Greg Gulyas, Compute Ontario / MRI
  • Thad Harroun, Brock University
  • Lauren Hayward, University of Waterloo
  • Harold Hodgins, Wilfrid Laurier University
  • Jemmy Hu, Sharcnet
  • Heqing Huang, Wilfrid Laurier University
  • Michael Hudson, Universtiy of Waterloo
  • Lucian Ivan, University of Waterloo
  • Craig Jeffrey, CMC Microsystems
  • Mohamed Khalil, University of Guelph
  • Ilias Kotsireas, Wilfrid Laurier University
  • Apichart Linhananta, Lakehead University
  • Chris Loken, University of Toronto
  • Pendar Mahmoudi, University of Waterloo
  • Hugh Merz, Sharcnet
  • Jonah Miller, University of Guelph
  • Pawel Pomorski, Sharcnet
  • Marcelo Ponce, University of Guelph
  • Sanjay Prbahakar, Wilfrid Laurier University
  • Michelle Przedborski, Brock University
  • Doug Roberts, Wilfrid Laurier University
  • Mina Rohanizadegan, University of Waterloo
  • Yasser Ruiz Blanco, Carleton University
  • Vincent Russo, University of Waterloo
  • Kaushik Saha, University of Waterloo
  • Erik Schnetter, Perimeter Institute
  • Hurmiz Shamana, McMaster University
  • An-Chang Shi, McMaster University
  • Affan Shoukat, York University
  • Dan Sinai, University of Western Ontario
  • Silviga Smith, Wilfrid Laurier University
  • Sebastian Steinhaus, Perimeter Institute
  • Avital Sternin, Brock University
  • Edward Sternin, Brock University
  • Ed Sykes, Sheridan College
  • Pawel Tecmer, McMaster University
  • Saul Teukolsky, Cornell University
  • Lennaert van Veen, University of Ontario Institute of Technology
  • Coby Viner, University of Western Ontario
  • Mark Wachowiak, Nipissing University
  • Renata Wachowiak-Smolikova, Nipissing University
  • Jingyi Wang, University of Waterloo
  • Xingyu Wang, University of Waterloo
  • Ryan Westernacher-Schneider, University of Guelph
  • Benjamin Wilk, University of Ontario Institute of Technology
  • Rory Woods, McMaster University
  • Thomas Wolf, Brock University
  • Serene Wong, York University
  • Li Xi, McMaster University
  • Lixan Zhan, Grand River Regional Cancer Centre
  • Xiaozhou Zhang, McMaster University

Time

Event

Location

9:00-9:30am

Registration, Coffee and Poster Setup

Atrium

9:30-9:45am

Welcome 

Theatre

9:45-10:10am

Ilias Kotsireas, Wilfred Laurier University

Recent advances in the search for complementary sequences

Theatre

10:10-10:35am

Hendrick De Haan, University of Ontario Institute of Technology

Simulating the Capture and Translocation of

Rigid fd Viruses though a Nanopore

Theatre

10:35-11:00am

Li Xi, McMaster University

New insights into polymer-induced drag

reduction in turbulent flows

Theatre

11:00-11:25am

Coffee Break

Bistro

 

Parallel Sessions I

(Each talk is scheduled for 12+3 or 15+5 minutes)

 

Track A

L. Van Veen, S. Wong, J. Desjardins, J. Miller

 

Track B

A. Ghasemi, E. Bembenek, L. Ivan, B. Wilk

 

 

 

Bob Room

 

 

Space Room

 

Track A Talks

 

11:25-11:55am

Lennaert Van Veen, University of Ontario Institute of Technology

Solving initial-boundary value problems without

numerical differentiation

Bob Room

11:55-12:10pm

Serene Wong, York University

Biological graph dissimilarity characterization using graph theory

Bob Room

12:10-12:25pm

James Desjardins, Brock University

Designing Electroencephalographic (EEG) analysis software with HPC in mind: Focus on a modular submission interface and flexible data annotation

Bob Room

12:25-12:40pm

Jonah Miller, University of Guelph

Testing Discontinuous Galerkin Methods in the Einstein Toolkit for Numerical Relativity

Bob Room

 

Track B Talks

 

11:25-11:55am

Abbas Ghasemi, University of Waterloo

HPC Application in Large Eddy Simulation of

Fuel Spray / Air Jet interaction

Space Room

11:55-12:10pm

Erik Bembenek, University of Waterloo

Modelling Surface Driven Flows in the Ocean

Space Room

12:10-12:25pm

Lucian Ivan, University of Toronto

A Fourth-Order Solution-Adaptive CENO Scheme for Space-Physics Flows on Three-Dimensional Multi-Block Cubed-Sphere Grids

Space Room

12:25-12:40pm

Benjamin Wilk, University of Ontario Institute of Technology

Predicting New Graphene - Boron Nitride 2D Nano-Materials: Structure Electron Bands Optical Response and Vibrations

Space Room

12:40-1:50pm

Lunch, Followed by the Poster Session

Bistro

1:50-2:00pm

Conference Photo

Atrium

2:00-3:00pm

Keynote Presentation

 

Saul Teukolsky

Simulations of Black Holes and Neutron Stars

Theatre

3:00-3:30pm

Coffee Break and Poster Session II

Atrium

 

 

Parallel Sessions II

(Each talk is scheduled for 12+3 or 15+5 minutes)

 

Track A

S. Kocheskeraii, S. Steinhaus, R. Woods, S. Green,

M. Ponce, R. Westernacher-Schneider

 

Track B

N.M. Abukhdeir, M. Garbanzo-Salas, A. Antipova, S. Badu, C. Viner,

M. Przedborski

 

 

 

 

Bob Room

 

 

Space Room

 

Track A Talks

 

3:30-3:50pm

Sadegh Babaii Kochekseraii, Sheridan College

Fast calculation of electro thermo static and elasticity fields in 3D-medium with isolated inclusions using application of Gaussian approximating functions

Bob Room

3:50-4:05pm

Sebastian Steinhaus, Perimeter Institute

HPC in Quantum Gravity

Bob Room

4:05-4:20pm

Rory Woods, McMaster University

Tree-Based Cosmological Radiative Transfer

Bob Room

4:20-4:35pm

Stephen Green, University of Guelph

Holographic Path to the Turbulent Side of Gravity

Bob Room

4:35-4:50pm

Marcelo Ponce, University of Guelph

Simulations of Binary Neutron Star Mergers

Bob Room

4:50-5:05pm

Ryan Westernacher-Schneider, University of Guelph

Towards Scaling Relations in Relativistic

Hydrodynamics and Gravity

Bob Room

 

Track B Talks

 

3:30-3:50pm

N.M. Abukhdeir, University of Waterloo

Polycrystalline On-Lattice Kinetic Monte Carlo

Simulations of Electrodeposition

Space Room

3:50-4:05pm

Marcial Garbanzo-Salas, University of Western Ontario

Uses of HPC in radar data processing and analysis

Space Room

4:05-4:20pm

Alena Antipova, University of Western Ontario

Motion of disc-shaped colloids and pairs of colloidal

discs in a nematic liquid crystal

Space Room

4:20-4:35pm

Shyam Badu, Wilfred Laurier University

Modeling of RNA Nanotube using Molecular Dynamics Simulation

Space Room

4:35-4:50pm

Coby Viner, University of Western Ontario

Validation of predicted mRNA splicing mutations using high-throughput transcriptome data

Space Room

4:50-5:05pm

Michelle Przedborski, Brock University

Critical Behavior of the Classical XY-model on Fractal Structures

Space Room

 

 

Mercredi mai 07, 2014

The problem of calculation of electro and thermo static fields in an infinite homogeneous medium with a heterogeneous isolated inclusion (Kanaun et al) has shown to be reduced to the solution of integral equations for the fields inside the inclusion using Gaussian functions (V. Mazya) for the approximation of the unknown fields. Using this approach coefficients of the matrix of the discretized system will be obtained in closed analytical forms.

Collection/Series: 

 

Mercredi mai 07, 2014

The effects of the microstructure of metal films on device performance and longevity have become increasingly important with the recent advances in nanotechnology. Depending on the application of the metal films and interconnects certain microscopic structures and properties are preferred over others. A common method to produce these films and interconnects is through electrodeposition. As with every process the ability to control the end product requires a detailed understanding of the system and the effect of operating conditions on the resulting product.

Collection/Series: 

 

Mercredi mai 07, 2014

The goal of this research is to investigate theoretically the possibility of creating graphene-based semiconducting 2D heterosystems that allow tailoring of the band gap and creating states inside the gap by demand. Such systems are created in our computational experiment by depositing graphene on a layer of hexagonal boron nitride and adding hydrogen on top and bottom of the systems to passivate the dangling bonds and create covalent bonding between the layers of the system of interest.

Collection/Series: 

 

Mercredi mai 07, 2014

Discontinuous Galerkin finite element (DGFE) methods combine advantages of both finite differences and finite elements approaches. These methods scale extremely well and they have been very successful in computational fluid dynamics. As such we would like to transpose them to the domain of relativistic astrophysics. Recently we have implemented DGFE methods in the Einstein Toolkit a large numerical relativity codebase used by hundreds of scientists around the world.

Collection/Series: 

 

Mercredi mai 07, 2014

Electroencephalography (EEG) is a method for measuring brain activity by recording electrical fields at the scalp surface. Although it has the highest temporal resolution among brain imaging techniques it has low spatial resolution and is very sensitive to various forms of noise (e.g. movement artifacts electrical sources in the environment impedance artifacts and various biological artifacts typically generated from muscle activation).

Collection/Series: 

 

Mercredi mai 07, 2014
Speaker(s): 

Application of numerical simulations to quantum gravity are so far largely neglected yet they possess remarkable potential to learn more about the theory. For approaches that attempt to construct quantum spacetime from fundamental microscopical building blocks e.g. spin foam models the collective behaviour involving many building blocks is unexplored.Therefore we numerically simulate the collective dynamics of many of these building blocks using coarse graining techniques i.e.

Collection/Series: 

 

Mercredi mai 07, 2014

Many biological data sets and relationships can be modeled as graphs. Understanding how structure of these graphs relates to biological function is essential for understanding underlining mechanisms of disease and for aiding drug discoveries. Vertices of biological graphs represent individual entities such as genes and proteins. Edges represent the relationship between two cellular components such as physical and functional interactions. A challenging problem in the post-genomic era is graph comparisons as they are large typed complex and evolving.

Collection/Series: 

 

Mercredi mai 07, 2014
Speaker(s): 

Buoyancy driven flows at the top of the ocean or bottom of the atmosphere are inherently different from their interior dynamics. Oneidealized model that has recently become very popular to idealizethese surface flows with strong rotation is Surface Quasi-Geostrophic (SQG) dynamics. This model is appropriate for large-scale dynamics and assumes the motion is in near geostrophic and hydrostatic balance.

Collection/Series: 

 

Mercredi mai 07, 2014

Along with the development of computational resources computational fluid dynamics (CFD) has evolved in resolving the finest length scales and smallest time scales of the flow. Direct numerical simulation (DNS) resolves the finest flow scales known as Kolmogorov length scales which are responsible for the dissipation of the energy transferred from the large and intermediate length scales. However DNS simulations are computationally costly and demand very powerful resources which are not widely available to this day.

Collection/Series: 

Pages

Scientific Organizers:

Nasser Mohieddin Abukhdeir, University of Waterloo
Erik Schnetter, Perimeter Institute