Page 37 - 2012-01-20

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35
INTERNATIONAL
SUMMER
SCHOOL
FOR
YOUNG
PHYSICISTS
This year’s edition of the International Summer School for Young
Physicists (ISSYP) brought 40 top high school students from around
the world to Perimeter – 21 Canadians, plus 19 international students
from 12 countries – for two intense weeks of physics and fun. Nearly
500 students have participated in ISSYP since its launch in 2003.
ISSYP provides a unique opportunity for exceptional students to
“live science” for a few weeks at an age when they are weighing
career directions. In addition to learning sessions, they meet with
leading scientists, tour research labs, and forge lasting friendships
amid a spirit of camaraderie that models the true nature of scientific
research. ISSYP has helped launch many scientific careers.
In addition to ISSYP, three one-day GoPhysics! camps were held
across the country, giving a snapshot of the ISSYP experience to
approximately 25 students at a time.
TAKING
THE
SHOW
ON
THE
ROAD
:
PHYSICA
PHANTASTICA
Last year, over 1,000 students throughout Ontario and Canada got
excited about physics through entertaining and accessible Physica
Phantastica presentations. Physica Phantastica seeds scientific
literacy and creativity among grades 7 to 12, illuminating connections
between the scientific enquiry into the forces governing the universe
and the discovery of new knowledge and technologies.
BANKING ON YOUNG
SCIENTISTS
This year, theRBCFoundation pledged a generous
gift over four years to support International
Summer School for Young Physicists (ISSYP).
RBC’s gift has enabled Perimeter to bring
outstanding international students to ISSYP,
and to hire a master teacher to refresh its
curriculum and develop accompanying hands-on
experiments. One of the most exciting is a lab unit
demonstrating the photoelectric effect, through
which electrons are ejected from a metal when it
is exposed to light. Students can vary the colour
of the light and measure the energy of the emitted
electrons. Plotting out the results leads intuitively
to the equations governing the photoelectric
effect – letting students discover for themselves
the cornerstone idea of quantum mechanics. This
seminal experiment, and the equation for which
Einstein won the Nobel Prize, are now within easy
reach of high school students.