Hopf Algebras in Kitaev's Quantum Double Models: Mathematical Connections from Gauge Theory to Topological Quantum Computing and Categorical Quantum Mechanics

Conference Date: 
Monday, July 31, 2017 (All day) to Friday, August 4, 2017 (All day)
Scientific Areas: 
Condensed Matter
Mathematical Physics
Quantum Foundations
Quantum Gravity
Quantum Information

 

The Kitaev quantum double models are a family of topologically ordered spin models originally proposed to exploit the novel condensed matter phenomenology of topological phases for fault-tolerant quantum computation. Their physics is inherited from topological quantum field theories, while their underlying mathematical structure is based on a class of Hopf algebras. This structure is also seen across diverse fields of physics, and so allows connections to be made between the Kitaev models and topics as varied as quantum gauge theory and modified strong complementarity. This workshop will explore this shared mathematical structure and in so doing develop the connections between the fields of mathematical physics, quantum gravity, quantum information, condensed matter and quantum foundations.

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  • Andreas Bauer, Free University of Berlin
  • Liang Chang, Chern Institute of Mathematics
  • Bianca Dittrich, Perimeter Institute
  • Ross Duncan, University of Strathclyde
  • Tobias Fritz, Max Planck Institute for Mathematics in the Sciences
  • Jurgen Fuchs, Karlstad University
  • Davide Gaiotto, Perimeter Institute
  • Cesar Galindo, Universidad de los Andes
  • Robert Koenig, Technical University of Munich
  • Catherine Meusburger, Friedrich-Alexander Universitaet
  • Michael Mueger, Radboud University Nijmegen
  • David Reutter, University of Oxford
  • Eric Rowell, Texas A&M University
  • Burak Sahinoglu, California Institute of Technology
  • Joost Slingerland, National University of Ireland
  • Pawel Sobocinski, University of Southampton
  • Dominic Williamson, University of Vienna
  • Derek Wise, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg
  •  
  • Andreas Bauer, Free University of Berlin
  • Courtney Brell, Perimeter Institute
  • Liang Chang, Chern Institute of Mathematics
  • Aaron Conlon, Maynooth University
  • Bianca Dittrich, Perimeter Institute
  • Ross Duncan, University of Strathclyde
  • Jason Erbele,  Victor Valley College
  • Javier Espiro, Universidade de Sao Paolo
  • Tobias Fritz, Max Planck Institute for Mathematics in the Sciences
  • Jurgen Fuchs, Karlstad University
  • Davide Gaiotto, Perimeter Institute
  • Cesar Galindo, Universidad de los Andes
  • Stefano Gogioso, University of Oxford
  • Daniel Gottesman, Perimeter Institute
  • Juan Pablo Ibieta Jimenez, Universidade de Sao Paolo
  • Theo Johnson-Freyd, Perimeter Institute
  • Martti Karvonen, University of Edinburgh
  • Robert Koenig, Technical University of Munich
  • Tian Lan, Perimeter Institute
  • Catherine Meusburger, Friedrich-Alexander Universitaet
  • Michael Mueger, Radboud University Nijmegen
  • Domenico Pellegrino, Maynooth University
  • Prince Osei, Perimeter Institute
  • Abdulmajid Osumanu, University of Waterloo
  • David Reutter, University of Oxford
  • Eric Rowell, Texas A&M University
  • Burak Sahinoglu, California Institute of Technology
  • Bernd Schroers, Heriot-Watt University 
  • Joost Slingerland, National University of Ireland
  • Pawel Sobocinski, University of Southampton
  • Fred Soglohu, AIMS, Ghana
  • Chenjie Wang, Perimeter Institute
  • Alex Weekes, Perimeter Institute
  • Carolin Wille, Free University of Berlin
  • Dominic Williamson, University of Vienna
  • Derek Wise, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg
  • Jon Yard, Perimeter Institute
  • Shuo Yang, Perimeter Institute
  • Theodore Yoder, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
  • Beni Yoshida, Perimeter Institute
  • Lucy Zhang, University of Toronto

SCHEDULE SUBJECT TO CHANGES

Monday, July 31st, 2017

Time

Event

Location

9:00 – 9:30am

Registration

Reception

9:30 – 9:45am

Welcome and Opening Remarks

Bob Room

9:45 – 10:30am

Cesar Galindo, Universidad de los Andes
Semisimple Hopf algebras

Bob Room

10:30 – 11:00am

Coffee Break

Bistro – 1st Floor

11:00 – 12:00pm

Andreas Bauer, Free University of Berlin
The Hopf C*-algebraic quantum double models - symmetries beyond group theory

Bob Room

12:00 – 2:00pm

Lunch

Bistro – 1st Floor

2:00 – 3:00pm

Michael Mueger, Radboud University Nijmegen
Modular categories and the Witt group

Bob Room

3:00 – 4:00pm

Eric Rowell, Texas A&M University
Topological Quantum Computation

Bob Room

4:00 – 4:30pm

Coffee Break

Bistro – 1st Floor

4:30 – 5:30pm

Davide Gaiotto, Perimeter Institute
Gapped phases of matter vs. Topological field theories

Bob Room

 

Tuesday, August 1st, 2017

Time

Event

Location

9:30 – 10:30am

Derek Wise, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg
An Introduction to Hopf Algebra Gauge Theory

Bob Room

10:30 – 11:00am

Coffee Break

Bistro – 1st Floor

11:00 – 12:00pm

Catherine Meusburger, Friedrich-Alexander Universitaet
Kitaev lattice models as a Hopf algebra gauge theory

Bob Room

12:00 - 12:10pm Conference Photo TBA

12:00 – 2:00pm

Lunch

Bistro – 1st Floor

2:00 – 3:00pm

Discussion 1

Bob Room

3:00 – 4:00pm

Jurgen Fuchs, Karlstad University
Topological defects and higher-categorical structures

Bob Room

4:00 – 4:30pm

Coffee Break

Bistro – 1st Floor

4:30 – 5:30pm

Bianca Dittrich, Perimeter Institute
From 3D TQFTs to 4D models with defects

Bob Room

 

Wednesday, August 2nd, 2017

Time

Event

Location

9:30 – 10:30am

Liang Chang, Chern Institute of Mathematics
Kitaev models based on  unitary quantum groupoids

Bob Room

10:30 – 11:00am

Coffee Break

Bistro – 1st Floor

11:00 – 12:00pm

Ross Duncan, University of Strathclyde
Introduction to CQM

Bob Room

12:00 – 2:00pm

Lunch

Bistro – 1st Floor

2:00 – 3:00pm

Discussion 2

Bob Room

3:00 – 4:00pm

Pawel Sobocinski, University of Southampton
Interacting Hopf monoids and Graphical Linear Algebra

Bob Room

4:00 – 4:30pm

Coffee Break

Bistro – 1st Floor

4:30 – 5:30pm

Poster Session

Bob Room

5:30pm onwards

Banquet

Bistro – 2nd Floor

 

Thursday, August 3rd, 2017

Time

Event

Location

9:30 – 10:30am

Burak Sahinoglu, California Institute of Technology
A tensor network framework for topological phases of quantum matter

Bob Room

10:30 – 11:00am

Coffee Break

Bistro – 1st Floor

11:00 – 12:00pm

Tobias Fritz, Max Planck Institute for Mathematics in the Sciences
The Kitaev model and aspects of semisimple Hopf algebras via the graphical calculus

Bob Room

12:00 – 2:00pm

Lunch

Bistro – 1st Floor

2:00 – 3:00pm

Discussion 3

Bob Room

3:00 – 4:00pm

Robert Koenig, Technical University of Munich
Quantum computation with Turaev-Viro codes

Bob Room

4:00 – 4:30pm

Coffee Break

Bistro – 1st Floor

4:30 – 5:30pm

David Reutter, University of Oxford
Frobenius algebras, Hopf algebras and 3-categories

Bob Room

 

Friday, August 4th, 2017

Time

Event

Location

9:30 – 10:30am

Joost Slingerland, National University of Ireland
Hopf algebras and parafermionic lattice models

Bob Room

10:30 – 11:00am

Coffee Break

Bistro – 1st Floor

11:00 – 12:00pm

Dominic Williamson, University of Vienna
Symmetry-enriched topological order in tensor networks: Gauging and anyon condensation

Bob Room

12:00 – 2:00pm

Lunch

Bistro – 1st Floor

2:00 – 4:00pm

Chaired Discussion

Bob Room

4:00 – 4:30pm

Coffee Break

Bistro – 1st Floor

 

 

Andreas Bauer, Free University of Berlin

The Hopf C*-algebraic quantum double models - symmetries beyond group theory

Liang Chang, Chern Institute of Mathematics

Kitaev models based on  unitary quantum groupoids

Kitaev originally constructed his quantum double model based on finite groups and anticipated the extension based on Hopf algebras, which was achieved later by Buerschaper, etc. In this talk, we will present the work on the generalization of Kitaev model for quantum groupoids and discuss its ground states.

Bianca Dittrich, Perimeter Institute

From 3D TQFTs to 4D models with defects

Ross Duncan, University of Strathclyde

Introduction to CQM

Categorical quantum mechanics is a research programme which aims to axiomatise (finite dimensional) quantum theory as an algebraic theory inside an abstract symmetric monoidal category.  The central idea is that quantum observables can be axiomatised as certain Frobenius algebras, and that two observables are (strongly) complementary when their Frobenius algebras jointly form a Hopf algebra.  The resulting theory is surprisingly powerful, especially when combined with its graphical notation.  In this talk I'll introduce the main concepts and present some applications to quantum computation.

Tobias Fritz, Max Planck Institute for Mathematics in the Sciences

The Kitaev model and aspects of semisimple Hopf algebras via the graphical calculus

Jurgen Fuchs, Karlstad University

Topological defects and higher-categorical structures

Davide Gaiotto, Perimeter Institute

Gapped phases of matter vs. Topological field theories

Cesar Galindo, Universidad de los Andes

Semisimple Hopf algebras

Hopf Algebras: definitions, notations and examples. Duality. Semi simple Hopf algebras. Integrals (Haar integral). Theorem of Mascke and Theorem of Larson-Radford: Cosemisimple and involutive Hopf algebras. Representation theory of semisimple Hopf algebras: Fusion rules fusion categories and Tannakian reconstruction theory.  The Drinfeld Double and Yetter-Drinfeld modules: quasi-triangular structures and solution of Yang-Baxter equation. Group-theoretical semi simple Hopf algebras: abelian extensions, twisting deformations of finite groups.

Robert Koenig, Technical University of Munich

Quantum computation with Turaev-Viro codes

The Turaev-Viro invariant for a closed 3-manifold is defined as the contraction of a certain tensor network. The tensors correspond to tetrahedra in a triangulation of the manifold, with values determined by a fixed spherical category. For a manifold with boundary, the tensor network has free indices that can be associated to qudits, and its contraction gives the coefficients of a quantum error-correcting code. The code has local stabilizers determined by Levin and Wen. By studying braid group representations acting on equivalence classes of colored ribbon graphs embedded in a punctured sphere, we identify the anyons, and give a simple recipe for mapping fusion basis states of the doubled category to ribbon graphs. Combined with known universality results for anyonic systems, this provides a large family of schemes for quantum computation based on local deformations of stabilizer codes. These schemes may serve as a starting point for developing fault-tolerance schemes using continuous stabilizer measurements and active error-correction.

This is joint work with Greg Kuperberg and Ben Reichardt.

Catherine Meusburger, Friedrich-Alexander Universitaet

Kitaev lattice models as a Hopf algebra gauge theory

We show that Kitaev's lattice model for a finite-dimensional semisimple Hopf algebra H is equivalent to the combinatorial quantisation of Chern-Simons theory for the Drinfeld double D(H). As a result, Kitaev models are a special case of combinatorial quantization of Chern-Simons theory by Alekseev, Grosse and Schomerus.  This equivalence is an analogue of the relation between Turaev-Viro and Reshetikhin-Turaev TQFTs and relates them to the quantisation of moduli spaces of flat connections.
We show that the topological invariants of the two models, the algebra of operators acting on the protected space of the Kitaev model and the quantum moduli algebra from the combinatorial quantisation formalism, are isomorphic. This is established in a gauge theoretical picture, in which both models appear as Hopf algebra valued lattice gauge theories.

Michael Mueger, Radboud University Nijmegen

Modular categories and the Witt group

David Reutter, University of Oxford

Frobenius algebras, Hopf algebras and 3-categories

It is well known that commutative Frobenius algebras can be represented as topological surfaces, using the graphical calculus of dualizable objects in monoidal 2-categories. We build on related ideas to show that the interacting Frobenius algebras of Duncan and Dunne, which have a Hopf algebra structure, arise naturally in a similar way, by requiring a single 3-morphism in a 3-category to be invertible. We show that this gives a purely geometrical proof of Mueger's version of Tannakian reconstruction of Hopf algebras from fusion categories equipped with a fibre functor. We also relate our results to the theory of lattice code surgery.

Eric Rowell, Texas A&M University

Topological Quantum Computation

The (Freedman-Kitaev) topological model for quantum computation is an inherently fault-tolerant computation scheme, storing information in topological (rather than local) degrees of freedom with quantum gates typically realized by braiding quasi-particles in two dimensional media. I will give an overview of this model, emphasizing the mathematical aspects.

Burak Sahinoglu, California Institute of Technology

A tensor network framework for topological phases of quantum matter

We present a general scheme for constructing topological lattice models in any space dimension using tensor networks. Our approach relies on finding "simplex tensors" that satisfy a finite set of tensor equations. Given any such tensor, we construct a discrete topological quantum field theory (TQFT) and local commuting projector Hamiltonians on any lattice. The ground space degeneracy of these models is a topological invariant that can be computed via the TQFT, and the ground states are locally indistinguishable when the ground space is nondegenerate on the sphere. Any ground state can be realized by a tensor network obtained by contracting simplex tensors. Our models are exact renormalization fixed points, covering a broad range of models in the literature. We identify symmetries on the virtual level of the tensor networks of our models that generalize the topological invariance properties beyond fixed point models. This framework combined with recent tensor network techniques is convenient for studying excitations, their statistics, phase transitions, and ultimately for classification of gapped phases of many-body theories in 3+1 and higher dimensions.

Joost Slingerland, National University of Ireland

Hopf algebras and parafermionic lattice models

Pawel Sobocinski, University of Southampton

Interacting Hopf monoids and Graphical Linear Algebra

The interaction of Hopf monoids and Frobenius monoids is the productive nucleus of the ZX calculus, where famously each Frobenius monoid-comonoid pair corresponds to a complementary basis and the Hopf structure describes the interaction between the bases. The theory of Interacting Hopf monoids (IH), introduced by Bonchi, Sobocinski and Zanasi, features essentially the same Hopf-Frobenius interaction pattern. The free symmetric monoidal category generated by IH is isomorphic to the category of linear relations over the field of rationals: thus the string diagrams of IH are an alternative graphical language for elementary concepts of linear algebra. IH has a modular construction via distributive laws of props, and has been applied as a compositional language of signal flow graphs. In this talk I will outline the equational theory, its construction and applications, as well as report on ongoing and future work.

Dominic Williamson, University of Vienna

Symmetry-enriched topological order in tensor networks: Gauging and anyon condensation

Derek Wise, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg

An Introduction to Hopf Algebra Gauge Theory

A variety of models, especially Kitev models, quantum Chern-Simons theory, and models from 3d quantum gravity, hint at a kind of lattice gauge theory in which the gauge group is generalized to a Hopf algebra.  However, until recently, no general notion of Hopf algebra gauge theory was available.  In this self-contained introduction, I will cover background on lattice gauge theory and Hopf algebras, and explain our recent construction of Hopf algebra gauge theory on a ribbon graph (arXiv:1512.03966).  The resulting theory parallels ordinary lattice gauge theory, generalizing its structure only as necessary to accommodate more general Hopf algebras.  All of the key features of gauge theory, including gauge transformations, connections, holonomy and curvature, and observables, have Hopf algebra analogues, but with a richer structure arising from non-cocommuntativity, the key property distinguishing Hopf algebras from groups. Main results include topological invariance of algebras of observables, and a gauge theoretic derivation of algebras previously obtained in the combinatorial quantization of Chern-Simons theory.

 

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Scientific Organizers:

  • Courtney Brell, Perimeter Institute
  • Ross Duncan, University of Strathclyde
  • Daniel Gottesman, Perimeter Institute
  • Prince Osei, Perimeter Institute
  • Lucy Zhang, University of Toronto