Higher Algebra and Mathematical Physics

Conference Date: 
Monday, August 13, 2018 - 09:00 to Friday, August 17, 2018 - 14:30
Scientific Areas: 
Mathematical Physics

 

A double conference is a new eco-friendly conference format, whose purpose is to reduce long-distance travel while still fostering long distance interaction.  Events take place in two different locations connected by live video stream.

North American location: Perimeter Institute for Theortical Physics
European location:  Max Planck Institute for Mathematics

Download the poster here: HAMP Poster.jpg

"Higher algebra" has become important throughout mathematics, physics, and mathematical physics, and this conference will bring together leading experts in higher algebra and its mathematical physics applications. In physics, the term "algebra" is used quite broadly: any time you can take two operators or fields, multiply them, and write the answer in some standard form, a physicist will be happy to call this an "algebra". "Higher algebra" is characterized by the appearance of a hierarchy of multilinear operations (e.g. A-infinity and L-infinity algebras). These structures can be higher categorical in nature (e.g. derived categories, cohomology theories), and can involve mixtures of operations and co-operations (Hopf algebras, Frobenius algebras, etc.). Some of these notions are purely algebraic (e.g. algebra objects in a category), while others are quite geometric (e.g. shifted symplectic structures).

An early manifestation of higher algebra in high-energy physics was supersymmetry. Supersymmetry makes quantum field theory richer and thus more complicated, but at the same time many aspects become more tractable and many problems become exactly solvable. Since then, higher algebra has made numerous appearances in mathematical physics, both high- and low-energy.

The conference speakers and participants, drawn from both sides of the Atlantic and connected by live video streams, will explore these myriad aspects of higher algebra in mathematical physics.

Registration for this event is now closed.

 

North American Speakers
  • Davide Gaiotto, Perimeter Institute
  • Lisa Jeffrey, University of Toronto
  • Matilde Marcolli, Perimeter Institute & University of Toronto
  • David Nadler, University of California, Berkeley
  • Andrew Neitzke, University of Texas
  • Stephan Stolz, University of Notre Dame
  • Valerio Toledano Laredo, Northeastern University

European Speakers

  • Damien Calaque, Montpellier University
  • Tobias Dyckerhoff, Bonn University
  • Lotte Hollands, Hariot-Watt University
  • Sylvie Paycha, Postdam University
  • Jörg Teschner, Hamburg University
  • Bertrand Toën, Toulouse University
  • Katrin Wendland, Freiburg University
  • Ben Albert, Perimeter Institute
  • Robert Argus, George Mason University
  • Josh Boily-Porter, University of Waterloo
  • Arun Debray, University of Texas
  • Mykola Dedushenko, California Instittute of Technology
  • Justin Hilburn, University of Pennsylvania
  • Omar Kidawi, University of Toronto
  • Jeffrey Kroll, City University of New York
  • Justin Kulp, Perimeter Institute
  • Ji Hoon Lee, Perimeter Institute
  • Sanketh Menda, University of Waterloo
  • Natalie Paquette, California Institute of Technology
  • Eugene Rabinovich, University of California, Berkeley
  • Surya Raghavendran, Perimeter Institute
  • Kasia Rejzner, University of York
  • Sachin Gautam, Columbia University
  • Andrei Shieber, Perimeter Institute
  • Barak Shoshany, Perimeter institute
  • Aidan Suter, Perimeter Institute
  • Alex Takeda, Univeristy of California, Berkeley
  • Antonino Travia, University of South Florida
  • Alex Weekes, Perimeter Institute
  • Laura Wells, University of Notre Dame
  • Junya Yagi, Perimeter Institute
  • Samuel Yusim, University of Waterloo
  • Valentin Zakharevich, Johns Hopkins University

Monday, August 13, 2018

Time

Event

Location

8:30 – 9:00am

Registration

Reception

9:00 – 9:10am

Scientific Organizers
Welcome and Opening Remarks

Bob Room

9:10 – 10:10am

Davide Gaiotto, Perimeter Institute
N=1 supersymmetric vertex algebras of small index

Bob Room

10:10 – 10:35am

Coffee Break

Bistro – 1st Floor

10:35-11:35am

Jörg Teschner, Hamburg University
Geometric Langlands: Comparing the views from CFT and TQFT

Bob Room

11:35-12:00pm

Coffee Break

Bistro – 1st Floor

12:00 – 1:00pm

David Nadler, University of California, Berkeley
Cutting and gluing branes

Bob Room

1:00 – 2:30pm

Lunch

Bistro – 2nd Floor

2:30 – 4:00pm

Transatlantic Informal Discussions

Bob Room

4:00 – 4:30pm

Arun Debray, University of Texas
The low-energy TQFT of the generalized double semion model

Bob Room

4:30 – 5:00pm

Eugene Rabinovich, University of California, Berkeley
Perturbative Anomalies of the Massless Free Fermion and Formal Moduli Problems

Bob Room

 

Tuesday, August 14, 2018

Time

Event

Location

9:00 – 10:00am

Bertrand Toën, Toulouse University
Moduli of connexions on open varieties

Bob Room

10:00 – 10:30am

Coffee Break

Bistro – 1st Floor

10:30-11:30am

Lisa Jeffrey, University of Toronto
The Duistermaat–Heckman distribution for the based loop group

Bob Room

11:30-12:00pm

Coffee Break

Bistro – 1st Floor

12:00 – 1:00pm

Damien Calaque, Montpellier university
Vertex models and En-algebras

Bob Room

1:00 – 2:30pm

Lunch

Bistro – 2nd Floor

2:30 – 3:30pm

Gong Show – Part 1

Bob Room

3:30 – 4:00pm

Coffee Break

Bistro – 1st Floor

4:00 – 5:00pm

Gong Show – Part 2

Bob Room

5:30 onwards

Banquet

Bistro – 2nd Floor

 

Wednesday, August 15, 2018

Time

Event

Location

9:00 – 10:00am

Andrew Neitzke, University of Texas
Higher operations in supersymmetric field theory

Bob Room

10:00 – 10:30am

Coffee Break

Bistro – 1st Floor

10:30-11:30am

Lotte Hollands, Heriot-Watt University
Spectral problems for the E6 Minahan–Nemeschansky theory

Bob Room

11:30-12:00pm

Coffee Break

Bistro – 1st Floor

12:00 – 1:00pm

Matilde Marcolli, Perimeter Institute & University of Toronto
Homotopy types and geometries below Spec(Z)

Bob Room

1:00 – 2:30pm

Lunch

Bistro – 2nd Floor

2:30 – 4:00pm

Transatlantic Informal Discussions

Bob Room

4:00 – 4:30pm

Laura Wells, University of Notre Dame
G-equivariant factorization algebras

Bob Room

4:30 – 5:00pm

Alex Takeda, University of California, Berkeley
Stability conditions on Fukaya categories of surfaces:
Some new techniques and results

Bob Room

 

Thursday, August 16, 2018

Time

Event

Location

9:00 – 10:00am

Tobias Dyckerhoff, Bonn University
A categorified Dold–Kan correspondence

Bob Room

10:00 – 10:30am

Coffee Break

Bistro – 1st Floor

10:30-11:30am

Valerio Toledano Laredo, Northeastern University
Elliptic quantum groups and their finite-dimensional representations

Bob Room

11:30-12:00pm

Coffee Break

Bistro – 1st Floor

12:00 – 1:00pm

Sylvie Paycha, Potsdam University
An algebraic locality principle to renormalise higher zeta functions

Bob Room

1:00 – 2:30pm

Lunch

Bistro – 2nd Floor

2:30 – 4:00pm

Transatlantic Informal Discussions

Bob Room

4:00 – 4:30pm

Justin Hilburn, University of Pennsylvania
Symplectic duality and geometric Langlands

Bob Room

4:30 – 5:00pm

Omar Kidwai, University of Toronto
Higher length-twist coordinates and applications - effective superpotentials from the geometry of opers

Bob Room

 

Friday, August 17, 2018

Time

Event

Location

9:00 – 10:00am

Stephan Stolz, University of Notre Dame
Invertible topological field theories are SKK manifold invariants

Bob Room

10:00 – 11:00am

Coffee Break

Bistro – 1st Floor

11:00-12:00pm

Katrin Wendland, Freiburg University
A natural refinement of the Euler characteristic

Bob Room

12:00 – 2:00pm

Lunch

Bistro – 2nd Floor

2:00 – 4:00pm

Transatlantic Informal Discussions

Bob Room

 

 

Invited Speakers - European Location

Damien Calaque, Montpellier University

Vertex models and En-algebras

I will explain and state a conjecture of Kontsevich, that relates vertex models from statistical mechanics to En-algebras. I will also give the main ingredients of the proof of Kontsevich’s conjecture, which is a joint work in progress with Damien Lejay.

Tobias Dyckerhoff, Bonn University

A categorified Dold–Kan correspondence

Various recent developments, in particular in the context of topological Fukaya categories, seem to be glimpses of an emerging theory of categorified homotopical and homological algebra. The increasing number of meaningful examples and constructions make it desirable to develop such a theory systematically. In this talk, we discuss a step towards this goal: a categorification of the classical Dold–Kan correspondence.

Lotte Hollands, Heriot-Watt University

Spectral problems for the E6 Minahan–Nemeschansky theory

According to Nekrasov and Shatashvili the Coulomb vacua of four-dimensional N=2 theories of “class S”, subjected to the Omega background in two of the four dimensions, correspond to the eigenstates of a quantisation of the Hitchin integrable system. The vacua may be found as the intersection between two Lagrangian branes in the Hitchin moduli space, one of which is the space of opers (or quantum Hamiltonians) and one is defined in terms of a system of Darboux coordinates on the corresponding moduli space of flat connections. I will introduce such a system of Darboux coordinates on the moduli space of SL(3) flat connections on the three-punctured sphere through a procedure called abelianization and describe the spectral problem characterising the corresponding quantum Hitchin system. This talk is based on work to appear with Andrew Neitzke.

Sylvie Paycha, Potsdam University

 An algebraic locality principle to renormalise higher zeta functions

According to the principle of locality in physics, events taking place at different locations should behave independently of each other, a feature expected to be reflected in the measurements. We propose an algebraic locality framework to keep track of the independence, where sets are equipped with a binary symmetric relation we call a locality relation on the set, this giving rise to a locality set category. In this algebraic locality setup, we implement a multivariate regularisation, which gives rise to multivariate meromorphic functions. In this case, independence of events is reflected in the fact that the multivariate meromorphic functions involve independent sets of variables. A minimal subtraction scheme defined in terms of a projection map onto the holomorphic part then yields renormalised values. This multivariate approach can be implemented to renormalise at poles, various higher multizeta functions such as conical zeta functions (discrete sums on convex cones) and branched zeta functions (discrete sums associated with rooted trees). This renormalisation scheme strongly relies on the fact that the maps we are renormalizing can be viewed as locality algebra morphisms. This talk is based on joint work with Pierre Clavier, Li Guo and Bin Zhang.

Jörg Teschner, Hamburg University

Geometric Langlands: Comparing the views from CFT and TQFT

The goal of my talk will be to discuss the relation between two approaches to the geometric Langlands program. The first has been proposed by Beilinson and Drinfeld, using ideas and methods from conformal field theory (CFT). The second was initiated by Kapustin and Witten based on a topological version of four-dimensional maximally supersymmetric Yang–Mills theory and its reduction to a two-dimensional topological sigma model. After discussing some issues complicating a direct comparison we will formulate a proposal for a precise relation between two main ingredients in the two approaches.

Bertrand Toën, Toulouse University

Moduli of connexions on open varieties

This is a join work with T. Pantev. In this talk, we will discuss moduli of flat bundles on smooth algebraic varieties, with possibly irregular singularities at infinity. For this, we use the notion of “formal boundary”, previously studied by Ben Bassat-Temkin, Efimov and Hennion– Porta–Vezzosi, as well as the moduli of flat bundles at infinity. We prove that the fibers of the restriction map to infinity are representable. We also prove that this restriction map has a canonical Lagrangian structure in the sense of shifted symplectic geometry.

Katrin Wendland, Freiburg University

 A natural refinement of the Euler characteristic

The Euler characteristic of a compact complex manifold M is a classical cohomological invariant. Depending on the viewpoint, it is most natural to interpret it as an index of an elliptic differential operator on M, or as a supersymmetric index in superconformal field theories “on M”. Refining the Euler characteristic but keeping with both index theoretic interpretations, one arrives at the notion of complex elliptic genera. We argue that superconformal field theory motivates further refinements of these elliptic genera which result in a choice of several new invariants, all of which have lost their interpretation in terms of index theory. However, at least if M is a K3 surface, then superconformal field theory and higher algebra select the same new invariant as a natural refinement of the complex elliptic genus.

Invited Speakers - North American Location

Davide Gaiotto, Perimeter Institute

N=1 supersymmetric vertex algebras of small index

I will describe examples of holomorphic N=1 super-symmetric vertex algebras with small (non-zero) values of the elliptic genus. I will speculate on a relation to certain patterns in the theory of topological modular forms.

Lisa Jeffrey, University of Toronto

 The Duistermaat–Heckman distribution for the based loop group

The based loop group is an infinite-dimensional manifold equipped with a Hamiltonian action of a finite dimensional torus. This was studied by Atiyah and Pressley. We investigate the Duistermaat–Heckman distribution using the theory of hyperfunctions. In applications involving Hamiltonian actions on infinite-dimensional manifolds, this theory is necessary to accommodate the existence of the infinite order differential operators which aries from the isotropy representation on the tangent spaces to fixed points. (Joint work with James Mracek)

Matilde Marcolli, Perimeter Institute & University of Toronto

 Homotopy types and geometries below Spec(Z)

This talk is based on joint work with Yuri Manin. The idea of a “geometry over the field with one element F1” arises in connection with the study of properties of zeta functions of varieties defined over Z. Several different versions of F1 geometry (geometry below Spec(Z)) have been proposed over the years (by Tits, Manin, Deninger, Kapranov–Smirnov, etc.) including the use of homotopy theoretic methods and “brave new algebra” of ring spectra (To¨en–Vaqui´e). We present a version of F1 geometry that connects the homotopy theoretic viewpoint, using Zakharevich’s approach to the construction of spectra via assembler categories, and a point of view based on the Bost–Connes quantum statistical mechanical system, and we discuss its relevance in the context of counting problems, zeta-functions and generalised scissors congruences.

David Nadler, University of California, Berkeley

 Cutting and gluing branes

I’ll discuss some results and expectations about the behavior of branes in Betti geometric Langlands under cutting and gluing Riemann surfaces.

Andrew Neitzke, University of Texas

Higher operations in supersymmetric field theory

I will review the construction of “higher operations” on local and extended operators in topological field theory, and some applications of this construction in supersymmetric field theory. In particular, the higher operation on supersymmetric local operators in a 3d N=4 theory turns out to be induced by the holomorphic Poisson structure on the moduli space of the theory. This leads to a new way of establishing the non-renormalization properties of this Poisson structure, and also to a simple topological reason for the appearance of its deformation quantization when the theory is placed in Omega-background. This is an account of joint work with Christopher Beem, DavidB en-Zvi, Mathew Bullimore, and Tudor Dimofte.

Stephan Stolz, University of Notre Dame

 Invertible topological field theories are SKK manifold invariants

Topological field theories in the sense of Atiyah–Segal are symmetric monoidal functors from a bordism category to the category of complex (super) vector spaces. A field theory E of dimension d associates vector spaces to closed (d-1)-manifolds and linear maps to manifolds of dimension d. It turns out that if E is invertible, i.e., if the vector spaces associated to (d-1)-manifolds have dimension one, then the complex number E(M) that E associates to a closed d-manifold M, is an SKK manifold invariant. Here these letters stand for schneiden=cut, kleben=glue and kontrolliert=controlled, meaning that E(M) does not change when modifying the manifold by cutting and gluing along hypersurfaces in a controlled way. The main result of this joint work with Matthias Kreck and Peter Teichner is that the map described above gives a bijection between topological field theories and SKK manifold invariants.

Valerio Toledano Laredo, Northeastern University

Elliptic quantum groups and their finite-dimensional representations

I will describe joint work with Sachin Gautam where we give a definition of the category of finite-dimensional representations of an elliptic quantum group which is intrinsic, uniform for all Lie types, and valid for numerical values of the deformation and elliptic parameters. We also classify simple objects in this category in terms of elliptic Drinfeld polynomials. This classification is new even for sl(2), as is our definition outside of type A.

Participants - North American Location

Arun Debray, University of Texas

The low-energy TQFT of the generalized double semion model

The generalized double semion model, introduced by Freedman and Hastings, is a lattice field theory similar to the toric code, with a gapped Hamiltonian whose space of ground states depends on the topology of the ambient manifold. In this talk, I’ll explain how to calculate its low-energy limit, which forms part of a topological field theory, in terms of characteristic classes of the ambient manifold.

Justin Hilburn, University of Pennsylvania

Symplectic duality and geometric Langlands

In this talk I would like to briefly sketch how one can use the tools of derived symplectic geometry and holomorphically twisted gauge theories to derive a relationship between symplectic duality and local Langlands. Our starting point will be an observation due to Gaiotto-Witten that a 3d N=4 theory with a G-flavor symmetry is a boundary condition for 4d N=4 SYM with gauge group G.

By examining the relationship between boundary observables and bulk lines we will be able to derive constructions originally due to Braverman, Finkelberg, Nakajima. By examine the relationship between boundary lines and bulk surface operators one can derive new connections to local geometric Langlands.

This is based on joint work with Philsang Yoo, Tudor Dimofte, and Davide Gaiotto

Omar Kidwai, University of Toronto

Higher length-twist coordinates and applications - effective superpotentials from the geometry of opers

We describe joint work with L. Hollands on the geometry of the moduli space of flat connections over a Riemann surface. On the one hand, we generalize and compute certain "complexified Fenchel-Nielsen" coordinates for SL(2)-connections to higher rank using the spectral network "abelianization" approach of Gaiotto-Moore-Neitzke. We then use these coordinates to compute superpotentials, following a conjecture of Nekrasov-Rosly-Shatashvili which roughly states the following: a certain low energy effective twisted superpotential arising from compactifying a theory of class S is equal to the generating function (in the sense of symplectic geometry), in some special coordinates, of the Lagrangian submanifold of opers in the associated moduli space of flat connections.

Eugene Rabinovich, University of California, Berkeley

Perturbative Anomalies of the Massless Free Fermion and Formal Moduli Problems

It is conventional wisdom among physicists that anomalies of fermionic theories measure an obstruction to the existence of a well-defined (gauge-invariant) partition function. The aim of this talk is to use the formalism of Costello and Gwilliam to show how this wisdom is instantiated for perturbative anomalies of the massless free fermion. We will show how an action of a dg Lie algebra L on the massless free fermion theory gives rise to a line bundle over the formal moduli problem corresponding to L; the anomaly is precisely the failure of this line bundle to be trivial. Our running example will be the axial symmetry of the massless free fermion.

Alex Takeda, University of California, Berkeley

Stability conditions on Fukaya categories of surfaces:  Some new techniques and results

In this talk I will present some upcoming work on Bridgeland stability conditions on partially wrapped Fukaya categories of topological surfaces. The main result is a proof that the stability conditions defined by Haiden, Katzarkov and Kontsevich using quadratic differentials cover the entire stability space. This proof uses a definition of the new concept of relative stability conditions, which is a relative version of Bridgeland's definition, with functorial behavior analogous to compactly supported cohomology. This definition is exclusive to the setting of these categories, and I will discuss problems and possibilities regarding generalization to other types of categories.

Laura Wells, University of Notre Dame

G-equivariant factorization algebras

There are various ways to define factorization algebras: one can define a factorization algebra that lives over the open subsets of some fixed manifold; or, alternatively, one can define a factorization algebra on the site of all manifolds of a given dimension (possibly with a specified geometric structure). In this talk, I will outline a comparison between G-equivariant factorization algebras on a fixed model space M to factorization algebras on the site of all manifolds equipped with a (M, G)-structure, given by an atlas with charts in M and transition maps given by elements of G. I will introduce the definitions of these two concepts and then sketch the proof that there is a quasi-equivalence between these dg-categories. This is work in progress

 

 

 

Friday Aug 17, 2018
Speaker(s): 

The Euler characteristic of a compact complex manifold M is a classical cohomological invariant. Depending on the viewpoint, it is most natural to interpret it as an index of an elliptic differential operator on M, or as a supersymmetric index in superconformal field theories “on M”. Refining the Euler characteristic but keeping with both index theoretic interpretations, one arrives at the notion of complex elliptic genera.

Scientific Areas: 
 

 

Friday Aug 17, 2018
Speaker(s): 

Topological field theories in the sense of Atiyah–Segal are symmetric monoidal functors from a bordism category to the category of complex (super) vector spaces. A field theory E of dimension d associates vector spaces to closed (d-1)-manifolds and linear maps to manifolds of dimension d. It turns out that if E is invertible, i.e., if the vector spaces associated to (d-1)-manifolds have dimension one, then the complex number E(M) that E associates to a closed d-manifold M, is an SKK manifold invariant.

Scientific Areas: 
 

 

Thursday Aug 16, 2018
Speaker(s): 

We describe joint work with L. Hollands on the geometry of the moduli space of flat connections over a Riemann surface. On the one hand, we generalize and compute certain "complexified Fenchel-Nielsen" coordinates for SL(2)-connections to higher rank using the spectral network "abelianization" approach of Gaiotto-Moore-Neitzke.

Scientific Areas: 
 

 

Thursday Aug 16, 2018
Speaker(s): 

In this talk I would like to briefly sketch how one can use the tools of derived symplectic geometry and holomorphically twisted gauge theories to derive a relationship between symplectic duality and local Langlands. Our starting point will be an observation due to Gaiotto-Witten that a 3d N=4 theory with a G-flavor symmetry is a boundary condition for 4d N=4 SYM with gauge group G.

Scientific Areas: 
 

 

Thursday Aug 16, 2018

According to the principle of locality in physics, events taking place at different locations should behave independently of each other, a feature expected to be reflected in the measurements. We propose an algebraic locality framework to keep track of the independence, where sets are equipped with a binary symmetric relation we call a locality relation on the set, this giving rise to a locality set category. In this algebraic locality setup, we implement a multivariate regularisation, which gives rise to multivariate meromorphic functions.

Scientific Areas: 
 

 

Thursday Aug 16, 2018

I will describe joint work with Sachin Gautam where we give a definition of the category of finite-dimensional representations of an elliptic quantum group which is intrinsic, uniform for all Lie types, and valid for numerical values of the deformation and elliptic parameters. We also classify simple objects in this category in terms of elliptic Drinfeld polynomials. This classification is new even for sl(2), as is our definition outside of type A.

Scientific Areas: 
 

 

Thursday Aug 16, 2018

Various recent developments, in particular in the context of topological Fukaya categories, seem to be glimpses of an emerging theory of categorified homotopical and homological algebra. The increasing number of meaningful examples and constructions make it desirable to develop such a theory systematically. In this talk, we discuss a step towards this goal: a categorification of the classical Dold–Kan correspondence

Scientific Areas: 
 

 

Wednesday Aug 15, 2018
Speaker(s): 

In this talk I will present some upcoming work on Bridgeland stability conditions on partially wrapped Fukaya categories of topological surfaces. The main result is a proof that the stability conditions defined by Haiden, Katzarkov and Kontsevich using quadratic differentials cover the entire stability space. This proof uses a definition of the new concept of relative stability conditions, which is a relative version of Bridgeland's definition, with functorial behavior analogous to compactly supported cohomology.

Scientific Areas: 
 

 

Wednesday Aug 15, 2018
Speaker(s): 

There are various ways to define factorization algebras: one can define a factorization algebra that lives over the open subsets of some fixed manifold; or, alternatively, one can define a factorization algebra on the site of all manifolds of a given dimension (possibly with a specified geometric structure). In this talk, I will outline a comparison between G-equivariant factorization algebras on a fixed model space M to factorization algebras on the site of all manifolds equipped with a (M, G)-structure, given by an atlas with charts in M and transition maps given by elements of G.

Scientific Areas: 
 

 

Wednesday Aug 15, 2018
Speaker(s): 

This talk is based on joint work with Yuri Manin. The idea of a “geometry over the field with one element F1” arises in connection with the study of properties of zeta functions of varieties defined over Z. Several different versions of F1 geometry (geometry below Spec(Z)) have been proposed over the years (by Tits, Manin, Deninger, Kapranov–Smirnov, etc.) including the use of homotopy theoretic methods and “brave new algebra” of ring spectra (To¨en–Vaqui´e).

Scientific Areas: 

Pages

Scientific Organizers:

  • David Ayala, Montana State University
  • Lukas Brantner, Max Planck Institute for Mathematics
  • Kevin Costello, Perimeter Institute
  • Owen Gwilliam, Max Planck Institute for Mathematics
  • Andre Henriques, Oxford University
  • Theo Johnson-Freyd, Perimeter Institute
  • Aaron Mazel-Gee, University of Southern California
  • Peter Teichner, Max Planck Institute for Mathematics